Month: April 2017

Developer Hacks Together Object-Oriented HTML

Developer Hacks Together Object-Oriented HTML

An anonymous reader writes: Ever since I started coding, I have always loved object-oriented design patterns. I built an HTML preprocessor that adds inheritance, polymorphism, and public methods to this venerable language. It offers more freedom than a templating engine and has a wider variety of use cases. Pull requests appreciated!

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, programming
E-Commerce Is Clogging City Streets With Delivery Trucks

E-Commerce Is Clogging City Streets With Delivery Trucks

The Atlantic’s CityLab describes “a massive surge in deliveries to residential dwellings…creating a traffic nightmare.” An anonymous reader quotes their report:
While truck traffic currently represents about 7% of urban traffic in American cities, it bears a disproportionate congestion cost of $28 billion, or about 17% of the total U.S. congestion costs, in wasted hours and gas. Cities, struggling to keep up with the deluge of delivery drivers, are seeing their curb space and streets overtaken by double-parked vehicles, to say nothing of the bonus pollution and roadwear produced thanks to a surfeit of Amazon Prime orders… Often, the box trucks will double-park in a two-lane street if there’s no loading zone to pull into, snarling traffic behind them… “The streets were not designed for that kind of activity,” says Alison Conway, an assistant professor of civil engineering at the City College of New York.
Scott Kubly, director of the Seattle Department of Transportation, says “With the volume of deliveries, ticketing isn’t effective for us in terms of managing the street. UPS and FedEx will just negotiate a lump sum payment for all the tickets they get instead of fighting every ticket”… In 2011 in Washington, D.C., UPS alone received just shy of 32,000 tickets. Instead of adjudicating each ticket, many large cities will strike agreements or introduce programs through which delivery companies can pay off all tickets in one swoop.

The article points out online retails sales have grown 15% every year this decade in the U.S. — calling it the other side of the “retail apocalypse” that’s killing brick-and-mortar stores.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Transportation
Microsoft And Apple Target Schools In War With Chromebook

Microsoft And Apple Target Schools In War With Chromebook

An anonymous reader writes:
“Google [is] commanding 58% of U.S. K-12 schools. Windows is in second with around 22% and the combined impact of MacOS and iOS are close behind at 19%,” reports TechCrunch, citing figures from consulting firm Futuresource. But now Chromebooks are under fire from cheaper iPads and Microsoft’s upcoming Windows 10 Cloud laptop with its cloud-based software. “For many schools, the dream of a one-device-per-child experience has finally been realized through a consumer technology battle waged by the biggest names in the industry… Fostering an entire generation of first-time computer users with your software and device ecosystem could mean developing lifelong loyalties, which is precisely why all this knock-down, drag-out fight won’t be drawing to a close any time soon.”
That raises an interesting question. Do Slashdot readers remember the computers that were used in their own high schools — and did that instill any lifelong brand loyalty?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, education

Oculus will skip E3 2017: It’s not you, it’s me

Attendees at this year’s Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles will notice that a familiar structure has faded from the show’s sweeping skyline of corporate booths. The familiar black monolith bearing the Oculus logo will not be making an appearance at E3 2017.

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Posted by amiller in Blog
Australia Wants ISPs To Protect Customers From Viruses

Australia Wants ISPs To Protect Customers From Viruses

An anonymous reader quotes Sopho’s Naked Security blog:
In a column in The West Australian, Dan Tehan, Australia’s cybersecurity minister, wrote: “Just as we trust banks to hold our money, just as we trust doctors with our health, in a digital age we need to be able to trust telecommunications companies to protect our information from threats.” A companion news article in the same newspaper cited Tehan as arguing that “the onus is on telecommunications companies to develop products to stop their customers being infected with viruses”…
Tehan’s government roles include assisting the prime minister on cybersecurity, so folks throughout Australia perked up when he said all this. However, it’s not clear if there’s an actual plan behind Tehan’s observations — or if there is, whether it will be backed by legal mandates… Back home in Australia, some early reactions to the possibility of any new government interference weren’t kind. In iTWire, Sam Varghese said, “Dan Tehan has just provided the country with adequate reasons as to why he should not be allowed anywhere near any post that has anything to do with online security.”
The West Australian also reports Australia’s prime minister met telecommunications companies this week, “where he delivered the message the Government expected them to do more to shut dodgy sites and scams,” saying the government will review current legislation to “remove any roadblocks that may be preventing the private sector and government from delivering such services.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
How To Delete Your Data From Google's 'My Activity'

How To Delete Your Data From Google's 'My Activity'

Last summer Google revealed personalized data dashboards for every Google account, letting users edit (or delete) items from their search history as well as their viewing history on YouTube. Now Slashdot reader Lauren Weinstein writes:
Since posting “The Google Page That Google Haters Don’t Want You to Know About” last week, I’ve received a bunch of messages from readers asking for help using Google’s “My Activity” page to control, inspect, and/or delete their data on Google. The My Activity portal is quite comprehensive and can be used in many different ways, but to get you started I’ll briefly outline how to use My Activity to delete activity data.

CNET points out you can also access the slightly-creepier “Google Maps location history” by clicking the menu icon in the upper left corner and selecting “Other Google activity.” But Weinstein writes, “I have no problems with Google collecting the kinds of data that provide their advanced services, so long as I can choose when that data is collected, and I can inspect and delete it on demand. The google.com/myactivity portal provides those abilities and a lot more.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, privacy
As Print Surges, Ebook Sales Plunge Nearly 20%

As Print Surges, Ebook Sales Plunge Nearly 20%

An anonymous reader quotes CNN:
Sales of consumer ebooks plunged 17% in the U.K. in 2016, according to the Publishers Association. Sales of physical books and journals went up by 7% over the same period, while children’s books surged 16%. The same trend is on display in the U.S., where ebook sales declined 18.7% over the first nine months of 2016, according to the Association of American Publishers. Paperback sales were up 7.5% over the same period, and hardback sales increased 4.1%…
Sales of e-readers declined by more than 40% between 2011 and 2016, according to consumer research group Euromonitor International. “E-readers, which was once a promising category, saw its sales peak in 2011. Its success was short-lived, as it spiraled downwards within a year with the entry of tablets,” Euromonitor said in a research note.
The article includes an even more interesting statistic: that one-third of adults tried a “digital detox” in 2016, limiting their personal use of electronics. Are any Slashdot readers trying to limit their own screen time — or reading fewer ebooks?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, stats