Month: May 2018

US Treasury Secretary Calls For Google Monopoly Probe

US Treasury Secretary Calls For Google Monopoly Probe

After a 60 Minutes episode that focused on Google and its effective search monopoly, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin called for large tech companies to be investigated for potential antitrust violations. Asked whether Google was abusing its market dominance as a monopoly, Mnuchin told CNBC on Monday “these are issues that the Justice Department needs to look at seriously,” and argued that it was important to “look at the power they have” noting that companies like Google “have a greater and greater impact on the economy.” The Register reports: Mnuchin’s willingness to directly criticize Google and other tech companies and argue that they should be under investigation is just the latest sign that Washington DC is serious about digging in the market power of Big Internet. It is notable that it was 20 years ago, almost to the day, that America finally dealt with another tech antitrust problem when the Justice Department and 20 state attorneys general filed suit — on May 18, 1998 — against what was then the most powerful tech company in the country: Microsoft.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, business
FCC is Hurting Consumers To Help Corporations, Mignon Clyburn Says On Exit

FCC is Hurting Consumers To Help Corporations, Mignon Clyburn Says On Exit

Former Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, who left the agency this month, has taken aim at it in an interview, saying the agency has abandoned its mission to safeguard consumers and protect their privacy and speech. From her interview with ArsTechnica: “I’m an old Trekkie,” Clyburn told Ars in a phone interview, while comparing the FCC’s responsibility to the Star Trek fictional universe’s Prime Directive. “I go back to my core, my prime directive of putting consumers first.” If the FCC doesn’t do all it can to bring affordable communications services to everyone in the US, “our mission will not be realized,” she said. The FCC’s top priority, as set out by the Communications Act, is to make sure all Americans have “affordable, efficient, and effective” access to communications services, Clyburn said. But too often, the FCC’s Republican majority led by Chairman Ajit Pai is prioritizing the desires of corporations over consumers, Clyburn said. “I don’t believe it’s accidental that we are called regulators,” she said. “Some people at the federal level try to shy away from that title. I embrace it.” Clyburn said that deregulation isn’t bad in markets with robust competition, because competition itself can protect consumers. But “that is just not the case” in broadband, she said. “Let’s just face it, [Internet service providers] are last-mile monopolies,” she told Ars. “In an ideal world, we wouldn’t need regulation. We don’t live in an ideal world, all markets are not competitive, and when that is the case, that is why agencies like the FCC were constructed. We are here as a substitute for competition.” Broadband regulators should strike a balance that protects consumers and promotes investment from large and small companies, she said. “If you don’t regulate appropriately, things go too far one way or the other, and we either have prices that are too high or an insufficient amount of resources or applications or services to meet the needs of Americans,” Clyburn said.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
Tesla Model 3 Falls Short of Consumer Reports Recommendation

Tesla Model 3 Falls Short of Consumer Reports Recommendation

Consumer Reports published their review of the Tesla Model 3 today. The product review site liked the vehicle’s range of the battery and agile handling, but had issues with braking, controls, and ride quality. Overall, it failed to get a recommendation. CNBC highlights the key shortfalls: “Our testers also found flawsâ”big flawsâ”such as long stopping distances in our emergency braking test and difficult-to-use controls,” said a review in the publication. In particular, the car’s stopping distance of 152 feet from a speed of 60 miles per hour was slower than any of its contemporaries, including the Ford F-150, a full-size pickup. The location of almost all of Tesla’s controls on a touchscreen and the vehicle’s ride quality were also factors in the group’s decision. Tesla issued a statement in response to Consumer Reports’ stopping distance claim: “Tesla’s own testing has found braking distances with an average of 133 feet when conducting the 60-0 mph stops using the 18-inch Michelin all season tire and as low as 126 feet with all tires currently available. Stopping distance results are affected by variables such as road surface, weather conditions, tire temperature, brake conditioning, outside temperature, and past driving behavior that may have affected the brake system. Unlike other vehicles, Tesla is uniquely positioned to address more corner cases over time through over-the-air software updates, and it continually does so to improve factors such as stopping distance.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Transportation
Should T-Mobile Stop Claiming It Has 'Best Unlimited Network'?

Should T-Mobile Stop Claiming It Has 'Best Unlimited Network'?

An anonymous reader writes: Speed isn’t everything, or is it? According to a report from Ars Technica, the National Advertising Division (NAD) says T-Mobile should stop claiming that is has “America’s Best Unlimited Network” because it needs to prove it also has the widest geographic coverage and best reliability. T-Mobile is saying that speed outweighs all other factors.
“T-Mobile’s claim is based on data from Ookla and OpenSignal, which offer speed-testing apps that let consumers test their wireless data speeds,” reports Ars Technica. “Both Ookla and OpenSignal have issued reports saying that T-Mobile’s speeds were higher than Verizon’s, AT&T’s, and Sprint’s. The OpenSignal tests also gave T-Mobile an edge over rivals in latency and 4G signal availability.” T-Mobile “did not provide evidence that its network is superior in providing talk and text mobile services or in providing high-speed data more reliably or to a greater coverage area,” the industry group’s announcement said.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog