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German Supreme Court Rules Ad Blockers Legal

German Supreme Court Rules Ad Blockers Legal

New submitter paai writes: The publishing company Axel Springer tried to ban the use of ad blockers in Germany because they endanger the digital publishing of news stories. The Oberlandesgericht Koln (Germany’s Higher Regional Court of Cologne) followed this reasoning and forbade the use of ad blockers on the grounds that the use of white lists was an aggressive marketing technique. [The business model allows websites to pay a fee so that their “non aggressive” advertisements can bypass AdBlock Pro’s filters. Larger companies like Google can afford to pay to have the ban lifted on their website.] The Bundesgerichtshof (Federal Court of Justice or BGH) destroyed this court ruling today and judged that users had a right to filter out advertisements in web pages.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Zuckerberg: Facebook Doesn't Use Your Mic For Ad Targeting

Zuckerberg: Facebook Doesn't Use Your Mic For Ad Targeting

During today’s joint hearing before the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees, CEO Mark Zuckerberg fully denied the idea that Facebook listens in on your conversations via microphones to display relevant ads. Engadget reports: Senator Gary Peters (D-MI) asked him to answer “yes or no” whether Facebook used audio from personal devices to fill out its ad data, and Zuckerberg said no. The CEO explained that users can upload videos with audio in them, but not the kind of background spying that you’ve probably heard people talk about. Peters: “I have heard constituents say Facebook is mining audio from their mobile devices for the purpose of ad targeting. This speaks to the lack of trust we are seeing. I understand there are technical and logistical issues for that to happen. For the record, I hear it all the time, does Facebook use audio obtained from mobile devices to enrich personal information about its users?”

Zuckerberg: “We do not. Senator, Let me be clear on this. You are talking about the conspiracy theory passed around that we listen to what is going on on your microphone and use that. We do not do that. We do allow people to take videos on their device and share those. Videos also have audio. We do, while you are taking a video, record that and use that to make the service better by making sure that you have audio. That is pretty clear.”

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Tim Cook Says Ads That Follow You Online Are 'Creepy'

Tim Cook Says Ads That Follow You Online Are 'Creepy'

In a wide-ranging interview with MSNBC and Recode, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that everyone should know how much data they’re sharing and what can be inferred about us from that information. He added that privacy “is a human right” and said he’s worried about how advertisers and others can abuse access to our data. “To me it’s creepy when I look at something and all of a sudden it’s chasing me all the way across the web,” Cook said. “I don’t like that.” CNET reports: The comments came as part of a wide-ranging interview between Cook, MSNBC’s Chris Hayes and Recode’s Kara Swisher. MSNBC broadcast the special, named “Revolution: Apple changing the world” at 5 p.m. PT on Friday. The interview was taped the day after Apple’s education event in Chicago, where the company introduced a new 9.7-inch iPad and tools for teachers. The two publications released some early clips and comments from Cook over the past couple of weeks. That included remarks he made about Facebook and its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Cook noted that Apple purposely chose not to make “a ton of money” off its customers’ data and that Facebook failed to effectively regulate itself, prompting a need for government intervention. Along with Facebook and its privacy issues, Cook talked up DACA and immigration, tax reform, the changing job landscape and the need for everyone to learn coding, among other topics.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Facebook Demands ID Verifications For Big Pages, 'Issue' Ad Buyers

Facebook Demands ID Verifications For Big Pages, 'Issue' Ad Buyers

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Facebook is looking to self-police by implementing parts of the proposed Honest Ads Act before the government tries to regulate it. To fight fake news and election interference, Facebook will require the admins of popular Facebook Pages and advertisers buying political or “issue” ads on “debated topics of national legislative importance” like education or abortion to verify their identity and location. Those that refuse, are found to be fraudulent or are trying to influence foreign elections will have their Pages prevented from posting to the News Feed or their ads blocked. Meanwhile, Facebook plans to use this information to append a “Political Ad” label and “Paid for by” information to all election, politics and issue ads. Users can report any ads they think are missing the label, and Facebook will show if a Page has changed its name to thwart deception. Facebook started the verification process this week; users in the U.S. will start seeing the labels and buyer info later this spring, and Facebook will expand the effort to ads around the world in the coming months.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
MailChimp Bans Emails Promoting Cryptocurrency

MailChimp Bans Emails Promoting Cryptocurrency

“MailChimp to Cryptocurrency Promoters: Your Fake Money’s No Good Here,” jokes the headline at Gizmodo. The mass emailing service — which sends over a billion emails a day — just updated its Acceptable Use Policy to warn users that MailChimp “does not allow businesses involved in any aspect of the sale, transaction, exchange, storage, marketing, or production of cryptocurrencies, virtual currencies, and any digital assets related to an Initial Coin Offering, to use MailChimp to facilitate or support any of those activities.”
An anonymous reader quotes Gizmodo:
The ban on cryptocurrency promotion isn’t out of the blue so much as a clarification of existing use policies… In a statement to Gizmodo, MailChimp further clarified: “We recognize that blockchain technology is in its infancy and has tremendous potential. Nonetheless, the promotion and exchange of cryptocurrencies is too frequently associated with scams, fraud, phishing, and potentially misleading business practices at this time…” MailChimp previously held policies prohibiting multi-level marketing, “make money online” businesses, and “industries hav[ing] higher-than-average abuse complaints,” and earmarked “online trading, day trading tips, or stock market related content” for “additional scrutiny…” This follows similar, though less restrictive bans by Facebook (and Instagram by extension), Google, Linkedin, Twitter, and Snapchat on ICO ads, and country-wide bans in China and South Korea.

Futurism reports that the first victims are “responding in kind by attempting to read the riot act to a Twitter account whose avatar is a monkey with a hat,” strongly informing that monkey that “Centralized capricious power is exactly why we need blockchains.”

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Facebook Will No Longer Allow Third-Party Data For Targeting Ads

Facebook Will No Longer Allow Third-Party Data For Targeting Ads

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: In a surprise change, Facebook will give up one major data source that the company uses to help advertisers target relevant users on the platform. The company just announced that it will end a feature called Partner Categories, launched back in 2013 out of a partnership between Facebook and major data brokers. Third party data helps Facebook further atomize its user base into meaningful segments for advertisers.

Facebook confirmed to TechCrunch that the change is permanent, not a temporary precaution. In order to leverage the deep pool of data Facebook collects on users, the company mixes information that it obtains from users themselves (Pages a user liked, for instance) with information from advertisers (membership status in a loyalty program, for example) and with data obtained from third party providers. While Facebook feels comfortable with the integrity of its data sourcing within the first two categories, it feels less settled about dipping into these aggregate pools of third party data. The decision was issued in light of the company’s recent privacy concerns over third-party data mishandling.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog

Google To Ban All Cryptocurrency Advertisements

With an update to its financial services-related ad policies Google has announced that Cryptocurrency related ads on its services will be banned. It seems as if the company is taking a stand against the deeply unregulated cryptocurrency field.

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Posted by amiller in Ads, advertising, All News, bitcoin, Blog, Crypto, Cryptocurrency, google, Web News
Reddit Is Bringing Promoted Posts To Its Mobile Apps

Reddit Is Bringing Promoted Posts To Its Mobile Apps

Reddit is reportedly launching native promoted posts for its mobile apps. “The company said in an email to advertisers that its apps are the most popular way its 330 million monthly active users access Reddit content on mobile, and they now account for 41 percent of time spent on Reddit across all platforms,” reports Marketing Land. “Logged-in app users also spend 30 percent more time per day than users who log in from desktop, and 80 percent of app users don’t access Reddit on desktop, according to the company.” From the report: In-app promoted posts will have all the elements of a standard Reddit post, including upvotes, downvotes and comment threads. The native mobile ads will also include comments, which was not possible before on the mobile ads. Native promoted posts will be available on iOS starting Monday, March 19, and will roll out to Android in the coming weeks.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Huawei Got People To Write Fake Reviews For An Unreleased Phone

Huawei Got People To Write Fake Reviews For An Unreleased Phone

As spotted by 9to5Google, Huawei has apparently posted fake reviews on Best Buy for its new Mate 10 Pro, which is available for pre-order in the U.S. despite not having any deals with U.S. carriers. “The fake reviews, which are exclusively on the Best Buy website, are likely the result of a contest Huawei ran on Facebook,” reports The Verge. From the report: On January 31st, the company posted to a Facebook group with over 60,000 members, asking for people to leave comments on the Best Buy pre-sale page in exchange for a chance to beta test a Mate 10 Pro. The original post has been deleted, but 9to5Google obtained a screenshot before it went down. “Tell us how to why (sic) you WANT to own the Mate 10 Pro in the review section of our pre-sale Best Buy retail page,” the post states. On the Best Buy site, there are currently 108 reviews for the phone, 103 of which were written on or after January 31st, the day Huawei posted the contest. Many of the comments directly reference not having any actual hands-on experience with the product itself, but give the phone a five star rating. “I can’t wait to get my hands on this phone and demonstrate how amazing it is to people,” reads one. “This device looks exciting and beautiful and it would be amazing to have a chance to beta test it,” another reads. It seems Huawei is betting that loads of high ratings early on will make people trust the product and lead to higher sales. That’s all well and good except that these types of reviews are strictly against Best Buy policy, as 9to5Google points out. “Huawei’s first priority is always the consumer and we encourage our customers to share their experiences with our devices in their own voice and through authentic conversation,” a Huawei representative told The Verge in a statement. “While there are reviews from beta testers with extensive knowledge of the product, they were in no way given monetary benefits for providing their honest opinions of the product. However, we are working to remove posts by beta testers where it isn’t disclosed they participated in the review program.”

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog