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Time Warner Will Spend $100 Million On Snapchat Original Shows, Ads

Time Warner Will Spend $100 Million On Snapchat Original Shows, Ads

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Time Warner and Snap Inc. have announced a new deal that will bring increased ad spending and the development of new made-for-Snapchat shows. People familiar with the deal tell TechCrunch that it is valued at about $100 million spent over the next two years. The newly created shows will span a variety of genres, including scripted drama, daily news shows, documentaries and comedy. The shows will be similar to those already released by other networks on Snapchat, and run 3-5 minutes in a vertical format. Right now there is about one new show airing per day — this deal will push that to about three news shows per day, varying between the different genres outlined above. Snap will take 50 percent of the ad revenue generated by these shows and the content partners will keep the other half, according to the WSJ.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Google's Top Search Result For 'Target' Was A Tech Support Scam

Google's Top Search Result For 'Target' Was A Tech Support Scam

An anonymous reader quotes BleepingComputer:
Malicious ads displayed in Google search results for Target — the US retailer — redirected users to a tech support scam. The malvertising campaign was spotted on Friday by a US user who posted his observations to a StackExchange thread. The rogue ad appeared when users searched for the term “target,” right at the top of all search results, [and] used a feature of the Google Ads service that allows ad publishers to display a URL but redirect users to another link. For example, in the rogue ad, the displayed link was “target.com,” but users were redirected to “tech-supportcenter.us.” Surprisingly, this got past Google’s ad quality control service… The page users landed on was mimicking the style of Microsoft’s real website, but was urging users to call a phone number to remove a non-existent “HARDDISK_ROOTKIT_TROJAN_HUACK.EXE” file.

The article points out the same thing happen in February when Google’s top search result for Amazon was a spoof site with another tech support scam.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Google Following Your Offline Credit Card Spending To Tell Advertisers If Their Ads Work

Google Following Your Offline Credit Card Spending To Tell Advertisers If Their Ads Work

One of the new tools Google has announced for its advertisers today promises to tie your offline credit card data together with all your online viewing to tell advertisers exactly what’s working as they try to target you and your wallet. Consumerist reports: That return, for decades, was hard to measure in all but the most vaguely correlative of ways. Did people buy your product after seeing your TV ad? After seeing your billboard? On a whim after seeing neither? Who knows! But in the age of highly targeted, algorithmic advertising, the landscape is completely different. The apps on your phone know what you looked at and when, and can tie that in to what you see on other devices you’re also logged into their services on (like your work computer). Meanwhile, you’re leaving tracks out in the physical world — not only the location history of your phone, but also the trail of payments you leave behind you if you pay with a credit card, debit card, or app (as millions of us do). Google also introduced some offline measurements to its online tool suite back in 2014, when it started using phone location data to try to match store visit location data to digital ad views. But a store doesn’t make any money when you simply walk into it; you need to buy something. So Google’s tracking that very granularly now, too. “In the coming months, we’ll be rolling out store sales measurement at the device and campaign levels. This will allow you to measure in-store revenue in addition to the store visits delivered by your Search and Shopping ads,” Google explains to advertisers. That’s very literally a collection of spending data matched to the people who spent it, matched in turn to people who saw ads.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Facebook Downranks News Feed Links To Crappy Sites Smothered In Ads

Facebook Downranks News Feed Links To Crappy Sites Smothered In Ads

Facebook’s New Feed algorithm is targeting links that send people to crappy websites filled with advertisements. According to their blog post, Facebook defines a “low-quality site” as one “containing little substantive content, and that is covered in disruptive, shocking or malicious ads.” TechCrunch reports: The change could help Facebook fight fake news, as fakers are often financially motivated and blanket their false information articles in ads. High-quality sites may see a slight boost in referral traffic, while crummy sites will see a decline as the update rolls out gradually over the coming months. Facebook tells me that the change will see it refuse an immaterial number of ad impressions that earned it negligible amounts of money, so it shouldn’t have a significant impact on Facebook’s revenue. Facebook product manager for News Feed Greg Marra tells me Facebook made the decision based on surveys of users about what disturbed their News Feed experience. One pain point they commonly cited was links that push them to “misleading, sensational, spammy, or otherwise low-quality experiences… [including] sexual content, shocking content, and other things that are going to be really disruptive.” Today’s change is important because if users don’t trust the content on the other side of the links and ads they see in News Feed, they’ll click them less. That could reduce Facebook’s advertising revenue and the power it derives from controlling referral traffic. Getting sent to a low-quality, shocking site from News Feed could also frustrate users and cause them to end their Facebook browsing session, depriving the social network of further ad views, engagement and content sharing.

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
39 Years Ago The World's First Spam Was Sent

39 Years Ago The World's First Spam Was Sent

An anonymous reader write:
Wednesday was the 39th anniversary of the world’s first spam, sent by Gary Thuerk, a marketer for Massachusetts’ Digital Equipment Corporation in 1978 to over 300 users on Arpanet. It was written in all capital letters, and its body began with 273 more email addresses that wouldn’t fit in the header. The DEC marketer “was reportedly trying to flag the attention of the burgeoning California tech community,” reports the San Jose Mercury News. The message touted two demonstrations of the DECSYSTEM-20, a PDP-10 mainframe computer.
An official at the Defense Communication Agency immediately called it “a flagrant violation of the use of Arpanet as the network is to be used for official U.S. government business only,” adding “Appropriate action is being taken to preclude its occurence again.” But at the time a 24-year-old Richard Stallman — then a graduate student at MIT — claimed he wouldn’t have reminded receiving the message…until someone forwarded him a copy. Stallman then responded “I eat my words… Nobody should be allowed to send a message with a header that long, no matter what it is about.”
The article reports that today the spam industry earns about $200 million each year, while $20 billion is spent trying to block spam. And the New York Times even has a quote from the DEC employee who sent that first spam. “People either say, ‘Wow! You sent the first spam!’ or they act like I gave them cooties.”

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Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog