advertising

Auto Added by WPeMatico

Roku's New Wireless Speakers Automatically Turn Loud Commercials Down, Turn Show Audio Up

Roku's New Wireless Speakers Automatically Turn Loud Commercials Down, Turn Show Audio Up

Roku announced today that it’s getting into the audio business with the launch of its in-house Roku TV Wireless Speakers. The two HomePod-esque speakers work exclusively (and wirelessly) with Roku TVs, and feature software that will optimize audio from anything connected to the pair Roku TV, including cable boxes, antennas, and Bluetooth devices. The company also announced a new Roku Touch tabletop remote that’s similar to Amazon’s Alexa. Ars Technica reports: “Optimized” in this sense refers to the software-improved audio quality: automatic volume leveling will boost lower audio in quiet scenes and lower audio in loud scenes (and in booming commercials), and dialogue enhancement will improve speech intelligibility. Accompanying the Wireless Speakers is the Roku Touch remote, a unique addition to Roku’s remote family. The company has a standard remote that controls its set-top boxes and smart TVs, and it also has a voice remote that processes voice commands to search for and play specific types of content. The Touch remote is most like the voice remote, but it can be used almost anywhere in your home because it’s wireless and runs on batteries. It has a number of buttons on its top that can play, pause, and skip content playing from your Roku TV, and some of those buttons are customizable so you can program your favorite presets to them. There’s also a press-and-hold talk button that lets you speak commands to your TV, even if you’re not in front of it. Roku’s Wireless Speakers and Touch remote will begin shipping this October, and the company is running a deal leading up to the release. For the first week of presales (July 16 through July 23), a bundle consisting of two Wireless Speakers, a Touch remote, and a Roku voice remote will be available for $149. From the end of that week until October, the price will be $179. When the new devices finally come out, the bundle price will be $199.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Digital Ads Are Starting To Feel Psychic

Digital Ads Are Starting To Feel Psychic

It seems like everyone these days has had a paranoiac moment where a website advertises something to you that you recently purchased or was gifted without a digital trail. According to a new website called New Organs, which collects first-hand accounts of these moments, “the feeling of being listened to is among the most common experiences, along with seeing the same ads on different websites, and being tracked via geo-location,” reports The Outline. The website was created by Tega Brain and Sam Lavigne, two Brooklyn-based artists whose work explores the intersections of technology and society. From the report: “We are stuck in this 20th century idea of spying, of wiretapping and hidden microphones,” said Brain. “But really there is this whole new sensory apparatus, a complicated entanglement of online trackers and algorithms that are watching over us.” It is this new sensory apparatus that Brain and Lavigne metaphorically refer to as “new organs,” as if the online surveillance framework used by social media platforms like Facebook has somehow transfigured into a semi-living organism. “These new organs don’t actually need to listen to your voice to know that you like Japanese knives,” Lavigne told me. “They actually have ways of coming to know things about you that we don’t fully understand yet.” In other words, these new methods of data collection have become so uncannily accurate in their knowledge of you as to occasionally feel indistinguishable from actual ears listening in on and understanding intimate conversations.

There are a few things that we do already know about these new “organs” of data processing, as defined by Brain and Lavigne. We know, for instance, that they have an insatiable appetite for personal data. They gather this by first tracking online activity, which is enough to tell them what people like, what they search for, what they listen to, what they read, where they’re walking for dinner, and also, worryingly, who their friends are and what they like, read, purchase — data that is gathered without their awareness. But, then, the organs also gather information purchased from commercial data brokers about people’s offline lives, like how many credit cards they own, what their income is, and what they purchase when they go grocery shopping. And all of this information is triangulated with friends’ data, because if they know what those dear to you are buying — a Japanese knife, for instance — there is a good chance that that person will be interested in that very same thing. The new organs process this enormous amount of information to break you down into categories, which are sometimes innocuous like, “Listens to Spotify” or “Trendy Moms,” but can also be more sensitive, identifying ethnicity and religious affiliation, or invasively personal, like “Lives away from family.” More than this, the new organs are being integrated with increasingly sophisticated algorithms, so they can generate predictive portraits of you, which they then sell to advertisers who can target products that you don’t even know you want yet.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Twitter Will Show Who Pays For Ads and How Much They Spend

Twitter Will Show Who Pays For Ads and How Much They Spend

Twitter will show detailed information about advertisers in an attempt to combat meddling in future elections. You will now be able to search for a Twitter account and see all the ads it has run in the past seven days. “For U.S. political advertisers, users will be able to see billing information, ad spending, demographic targeting data and the number of times tweets have been viewed,” reports Bloomberg. From the report: The changes are part of Twitter’s broader efforts to clean up its service after lawmakers berated the company for failing to discover Russian influence peddling through fake accounts and divisive ads during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Earlier this week, the company began requiring more authentication from users. In May, it rolled out stricter rules that require advertisers running political campaign ads for federal elections to identify themselves and certify they are located in the U.S. The company has also banned ads from accounts owned by Russia Today and Sputnik.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Facebook Reverses Its Crypto Ad Ban

Facebook Reverses Its Crypto Ad Ban

Back in January, Facebook banned cryptocurrency ads because too many companies in this space were “not currently operating in good faith.” Now the social media company is reversing its ban effective immediately. “The company says it will allow ads and related content from ‘pre-approved advertisers,’ but will still not allow ads promoting binary options and initial coin offerings,” reports TechCrunch. From the report: This time around, it’s making advertisers go through an application process to determine their eligibility. Facebook will ask advertisers to include on their applications details like what licenses they’ve obtained, whether they’re a publicly traded company, and other relevant background information regarding their business. How thoroughly this information is fact-checked by Facebook staff remains unclear.

The company reminded users in the same announcement that they should continue to flag ad content that violates its guidelines. In other words, expect some bad ads to get through. Facebook explains its new requirements will keep some crypto advertisers from being able to hawk their businesses on the social network, but adds that its policy in this area continues to be a work in progress. Facebook’s Product Management Director, Rob Leathern, made the announcement.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Apple Is Reportedly Eyeing the Ad Business

Apple Is Reportedly Eyeing the Ad Business

An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNBC: The Wall Street Journal has published a new report detailing one thing we might expect to see on stage at WWDC next week: a digital ad platform expansion. According to the Journal, Apple has been in talks with major apps including Snapchat and Pinterest about the project: “Over the past year, Apple has met with Snap Inc., Pinterest Inc. and other companies about participating in an Apple network that would distribute ads across their collective apps, the people said. Apple would share revenue with the apps displaying the ads, with the split varying from app to app, they said.”

The report adds that the new ad effort would expand on the “nearly $1 billion” business of search ads, which it introduced to the App Store in 2016. In addition to app ads being display in search results in the App Store, developers could include advertisements in search results within their own apps: “Under the concept discussed internally and raised with potential partners, users searching in Pinterest’s app for ‘drapes’ might turn up an ad distributed by Apple for an interior-design app, or Snap users searching for ‘NFL’ might see an ad for a ticket-reseller app, one of the people said.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Lawyers Are Sending Mobile Ads To Patients Sitting In Emergency Rooms

Lawyers Are Sending Mobile Ads To Patients Sitting In Emergency Rooms

An anonymous reader quotes a report from NPR: Patients sitting in emergency rooms, at chiropractors’ offices and at pain clinics in the Philadelphia area may start noticing on their phones the kind of messages typically seen along highway billboards and public transit: personal injury law firms looking for business by casting mobile online ads at patients. The potentially creepy part? They’re only getting fed the ad because somebody knows they are in an emergency room. The technology behind the ads, known as geofencing, or placing a digital perimeter around a specific location, has been deployed by retailers for years to offer coupons and special offers to customers as they shop. Bringing it into health care spaces, however, is raising alarm among privacy experts.

Law firms and marketing companies from Tennessee to California are also testing out the technology in hospital settings. “Is everybody in an emergency room going to need an attorney? Absolutely not,” Kakis says. “But people that are going to need a personal injury attorney are more than likely at some point going to end up in an emergency room.” The advertisers identify someone’s location by grabbing what is known as “phone ID” from Wi-Fi, cell data or an app using GPS. Once someone crosses the digital fence, Kakis says, the ads can show up for more than a month — and on multiple devices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Should T-Mobile Stop Claiming It Has 'Best Unlimited Network'?

Should T-Mobile Stop Claiming It Has 'Best Unlimited Network'?

An anonymous reader writes: Speed isn’t everything, or is it? According to a report from Ars Technica, the National Advertising Division (NAD) says T-Mobile should stop claiming that is has “America’s Best Unlimited Network” because it needs to prove it also has the widest geographic coverage and best reliability. T-Mobile is saying that speed outweighs all other factors.
“T-Mobile’s claim is based on data from Ookla and OpenSignal, which offer speed-testing apps that let consumers test their wireless data speeds,” reports Ars Technica. “Both Ookla and OpenSignal have issued reports saying that T-Mobile’s speeds were higher than Verizon’s, AT&T’s, and Sprint’s. The OpenSignal tests also gave T-Mobile an edge over rivals in latency and 4G signal availability.” T-Mobile “did not provide evidence that its network is superior in providing talk and text mobile services or in providing high-speed data more reliably or to a greater coverage area,” the industry group’s announcement said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Ads Are Coming To Facebook Stories

Ads Are Coming To Facebook Stories

Facebook Stories has reached 150 million daily active users after launching nearly 14 months ago. So what’s the next logical step after reaching such a milestone? Advertisements. According to TechCrunch, Facebook Stories will start testing its first ads today in the U.S., Mexico and Brazil. From the report: They’re 5- to 15-second video ads users can skip, and while there’s no click-through or call to action now, Facebook plans to add that in the coming months. Advertisers can easily extend their Instagram Stories ads to this new surface, or have Facebook automatically reformat their News Feed ads with color-matched borders and text at the bottom. Facebook also plans to give businesses more metrics on their Stories performance to convince them the feature is worth their ad dollars.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Google Will Ban Bail-Bond Ads

Google Will Ban Bail-Bond Ads

First Google banned ads from payday lenders in 2016, now it will no longer allow ads from bail-bond companies. Ars Technica reports: In a blog post, the company suggested that such ads constitute a “deceptive or harmful product,” citing a 2016 study concluding that minority and low-income communities are typically most affected by such services. “For-profit bail-bond providers make most of their revenue from communities of color and low-income neighborhoods when they are at their most vulnerable, including through opaque financing offers that can keep people in debt for months or years,” Google wrote. Also in 2016, another study found that “there are 646,000 people locked up in more than 3,000 local jails throughout the U.S.,” simply for their inability to pay a bond, which is what drives many people to the services of a bondsman. The change will take effect in July 2018.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog
Placing Election Ads On Google Will Require a Government ID

Placing Election Ads On Google Will Require a Government ID

Google announced new policies Friday that will require advertisers to prove they are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident when buying election ads. “Under the new guidelines, Google will ask advertisers — be they individuals, organizations, or political action committees — to prove they are who they claim to be,” reports Gizmodo. “It will also require the ads to include a clear disclosure of who is paying for it.” From the report: The change comes after Google and other social media companies revealed their advertising platforms were abused by foreign actors, including the Russian government-backed troll farm Internet Research Agency, during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. It also places Google’s policies in line with U.S. laws for traditional media that restrict foreign entities from running election ads. Where Google’s effort falls short, at least in its current iteration, is the new policies only cover ads featuring candidates running for office. So-called “issue ads” that advocate a certain point of view on hot-button topics are not covered in Google’s policies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in advertising, Blog