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Jack Ma: In 30 Years People Will Work Four Hours a Day and Maybe Four Days a Week

Jack Ma: In 30 Years People Will Work Four Hours a Day and Maybe Four Days a Week

There could be benefits from artificial intelligence, Self-made billionaire, Alibaba chairman Jack Ma said, as people are freed to work less and travel more. From a report: “I think in the next 30 years, people only work four hours a day and maybe four days a week,” Ma said. “My grandfather worked 16 hours a day in the farmland and [thought he was] very busy. We work eight hours, five days a week and think we are very busy.” He added that if people today are able to visit 30 places, in three decades it will be 300 places. Still, Ma said the rich and poor — the workers and the bosses — will be increasingly defined by data and automation unless governments show more willingness to make “hard choices.” “The first technology revolution caused World War I,” he said, “The second technology revolution caused World War II. This is the third technology revolution.”

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
As AI Explodes, Investors Pour Big Bucks Into Startups

As AI Explodes, Investors Pour Big Bucks Into Startups

Investment in AI startups is on a tear as venture capitalists and corporate investors scramble to stake out a leadership position in what could be the driving trend in technology for decades to come. From a report: The financial interest in AI, machine learning and related technologies is hardly new. CB Insights has tracked some $18.4 billion invested in 2,541 AI-related startups since 2012. But the trend is only accelerating. In the latest MoneyTree report from PricewaterhouseCoopers and CB Insights, which showed otherwise mostly stagnant startup funding, AI and machine learning companies shined, reaching an eight-quarter high of $820 million invested in 90 companies. A flurry of significant investments in a number of AI-related companies this past week underscored the point. On Wednesday alone, for instance, AI-powered analytics software provider CognitiveScale raised a $15 million round, voice AI startup Snips raised $13 million and, to top it off, machine learning consultancy Element AI got an unusually large $102 million early-stage investment just eight months after the company was launched. Then on Thursday and Friday, two other AI-powered companies, Conviva and Codota, announced fundings too.

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
Garry Kasparov: The World Should Embrace Artificial Intelligence

Garry Kasparov: The World Should Embrace Artificial Intelligence

“Chess champion Garry Kasparov was beaten at his game by a chess-playing AI,” writes dryriver. “But he does not think that AI is a bad thing.” From Kasparov’s interview with the BBC:
“We have to start recognizing the inevitability of machines taking over more and more tasks that we used to do in the past. It’s called progress. Machines replaced farm animals and all forms of manual labor, and now machines are about to take over more menial parts of cognition. Big deal. It’s happening. And we should not be alarmed about it. We should just take it as a fact and look into the future, trying to understand how can we adjust.”

Kasparov has given the issue a lot of thought — last month he released a new book called Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins. But he also says that the IBM machine that beat him “was anything but intelligent. It was as intelligent as your alarm clock. A very expensive one, a $10 million alarm clock, but still an alarm clock. Very poweful — brute force, with little chess knowledge. But chess proved to be vulnerable to the brute force. it could be crunched once hardware got fast enough and databases got big enough and algorithms got smart enough.”

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
Samsung's Bixby Voice Assistant Is Finally Coming to the US — But Only As a Preview

Samsung's Bixby Voice Assistant Is Finally Coming to the US — But Only As a Preview

When the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+ went on sale in the North American market, it was missing one of its most touted features — the Bixby smart assistant. Technically, it was available on launch day but its voice functionality was missing due to issues with the English language version, thus rendering the dedicated Bixby button on the side of the S8 and S8+ nearly useless. Today, Bixby Voice is finally making its stateside debut — but only as a preview. TechCrunch reports: The company is positioning this is a “sneak peak” for the feature that was initially planned to debut on its new flagship phones. Starting this week, a select number of Galaxy S8 and S8+ can sign up to be among the first in the U.S. to test it out. From the sound of it, Samsung’s still working on some tweaks here, using this limited launch to basically do some public beta testing. The company didn’t have a lot to say about the closed launch, aside from reiterating some of its grandiose plans for making Bixby, “an integral part of our connected ecosystem,” according to the company’s CTO.

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
Microsoft's AI Is the First to Reach a Perfect Ms. Pac-Man Score

Microsoft's AI Is the First to Reach a Perfect Ms. Pac-Man Score

Maluuba, a deep-learning team acquired by Microsoft in January, has created an AI system that has achieved the perfect score for Ms. Pac-Man. According to The Verge, the AI system “learned how to reach the game’s maximum point value of 999,900 on Atari 2600, using a unique combination of reinforcement learning with a divide-and-conquer method.” From the report: Though AI has conquered a wealth of retro games, Ms. Pac-Man has remained elusive for years, due to the gameâ(TM)s intentional lack of predictability. Turns out itâ(TM)s a toughie for humans as well. Many have tried to reach Ms. Pac-Manâ(TM)s top score, only coming as close as 266,330 on the Atari 2600 version. The gameâ(TM)s elusive 999,900 number though, has so far only been achieved by mortals via cheats. Maluuba was able to use AI to beat the game by tasking out responsibilities, breaking it up into bite-sized jobs assigned to over 150 agents. The team then taught the AI using what they call Hybrid Reward Architecture â” a combination of reinforcement learning with a divide-and-conquer method. Individual agents were assigned piecemeal tasks â” like finding a specific pellet â” which worked in tandem with other agents to achieve greater goals. Maluuba then designated a top agent (Microsoft likens this to a senior manager at a company) that took suggestions from all the agents in order to inform decisions on where to move Ms. Pac-Man. The best results came when individual agents âoeacted very egotisticallyâ and the top agent focused on what was best for the overall team, taking into account not only how many agents wanted to go in a particular direction, but the importance of that direction.

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
Facebook Built an AI System That Learned To Lie To Get What It Wants

Facebook Built an AI System That Learned To Lie To Get What It Wants

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Quartz: Humans are natural negotiators. We arrange dozens of tiny little details throughout our day to produce a desired outcome: What time a meeting should start, when you can take time off work, or how many cookies you can take from the cookie jar. Machines typically don’t share that affinity, but new research from Facebook’s AI research lab might offer a starting point to change that. The new system learned to negotiate from looking at each side of 5,808 human conversations, setting the groundwork for bots that could schedule meetings or get you the best deal online. Facebook researchers used a game to help the bot learn how to haggle over books, hats, and basketballs. Each object had a point value, and they needed to be split between each bot negotiator via text. From the human conversations (gathered via Amazon Mechanical Turk), and testing its skills against itself, the AI system didn’t only learn how to state its demands, but negotiation tactics as well — specifically, lying. Instead of outright saying what it wanted, sometimes the AI would feign interest in a worthless object, only to later concede it for something that it really wanted. Facebook isn’t sure whether it learned from the human hagglers or whether it stumbled upon the trick accidentally, but either way when the tactic worked, it was rewarded.

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
Robots Are Coming For Our Ms. Pac-Man High Scores

Robots Are Coming For Our Ms. Pac-Man High Scores

A Microsoft-made AI system has achieved a perfect score of 999,990 points on the Atari 2600 version of the classic ‘Ms. Pac-Man.’ From a report: Researchers at the Microsoft-owned deep learning company Maluuba have used an AI system to break the all-time Ms. Pac-Man record. In a blog post, Microsoft wrote that, “using a divide-and-conquer method that could have broad implications for teaching AI agents to do complex tasks that augment human capabilities,” Maluuba’s AI was able to record a perfect Ms. Pac-Man score of 999,990 on the Atari 2600 version of the game, breaking the all-time record of 933,580.

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
US Weighs Restricting Chinese Investment In Artificial Intelligence

US Weighs Restricting Chinese Investment In Artificial Intelligence

An anonymous reader shares a Reuters report: The United States appears poised to heighten scrutiny of Chinese investment in Silicon Valley to better shield sensitive technologies seen as vital to U.S. national security, current and former U.S. officials tell Reuters. Of particular concern is China’s interest in fields such as artificial intelligence and machine learning, which have increasingly attracted Chinese capital in recent years. The worry is that cutting-edge technologies developed in the United States could be used by China to bolster its military capabilities and perhaps even push it ahead in strategic industries. The U.S. government is now looking to strengthen the role of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), the inter-agency committee that reviews foreign acquisitions of U.S. companies on national security grounds. An unreleased Pentagon report, viewed by Reuters, warns that China is skirting U.S. oversight and gaining access to sensitive technology through transactions that currently don’t trigger CFIUS review.

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
Cook Says Apple Is Focusing on Making an Autonomous Car System

Cook Says Apple Is Focusing on Making an Autonomous Car System

An anonymous reader shares a Bloomberg report: After years toiling away in secret on its car project, Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook has for the first time laid out exactly what the company is up to in the automotive market: It’s concentrating on self-driving technology. “We’re focusing on autonomous systems,” Cook said in an interview on Bloomberg Television. “It’s a core technology that we view as very important. We sort of see it as the mother of all AI projects,” Cook said in his most detailed comments to date on Apple’s plans in the car space. “It’s probably one of the most difficult A.I. projects actually to work on.” […] “There is a major disruption looming there,” Cook said on Bloomberg Television, citing self-driving technology, electric vehicles and ride-hailing. “You’ve got kind of three vectors of change happening generally in the same time frame.” Cook was also bullish about the prospects for electric vehicles, a market which last week helped Tesla become the world’s fourth-biggest carmaker by market capitalization, even as it ranks well outside the top 10 by unit sales.”It’s a marvelous experience not to stop at the filling station or the gas station,” Cook said.

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog
Artificial Intelligence Can Now Predict Suicide With Remarkable Accuracy

Artificial Intelligence Can Now Predict Suicide With Remarkable Accuracy

An anonymous reader writes: Colin Walsh, data scientist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and his colleagues have created machine-learning algorithms that predict, with unnerving accuracy, the likelihood that a patient will attempt suicide. In trials, results have been 80-90% accurate when predicting whether someone will attempt suicide within the next two years, and 92% accurate in predicting whether someone will attempt suicide within the next week. The prediction is based on data that’s widely available from all hospital admissions, including age, gender, zip codes, medications, and prior diagnoses. Walsh and his team gathered data on 5,167 patients from Vanderbilt University Medical Center that had been admitted with signs of self-harm or suicidal ideation. They read each of these cases to identify the 3,250 instances of suicide attempts. This set of more than 5,000 cases was used to train the machine to identify those at risk of attempted suicide compared to those who committed self-harm but showed no evidence of suicidal intent.

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Posted by amiller in AI, Blog