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Chris Lattner, Poached From Apple To Become Tesla's Top Software Executive, Quits After 6 Months

Chris Lattner, Poached From Apple To Become Tesla's Top Software Executive, Quits After 6 Months

Tesla said last night Chris Lattner, the vice president of Autopilot software, has left the company about six months after the electric car-maker hired him away from Apple. From a report: Lattner had led the software development team in charge of Autopilot. Tesla executive Jim Keller is now in charge of Autopilot hardware and software. The company announced it had also hired OpenAI research scientist Andrej Karpathy, who will serve as Tesla’s new director of artificial intelligence and Tesla Vision. “Chris just wasn’t the right fit for Tesla, and we’ve decided to make a change,” the company told reporters in a statement. “We wish him the best.” Lattner tweeted last night, “Turns out that Tesla isn’t a good fit for me after all. I’m interested to hear about interesting roles for a seasoned engineering leader!” Lattner is a widely respected figure in the industry. He is the main author of LLVM as well as Apple’s Swift programming language. We interviewed him earlier this year.

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Posted by amiller in apple, Blog
The Right To Repair Movement Is Forcing Apple To Change

The Right To Repair Movement Is Forcing Apple To Change

The executive director of Repair.org says Apple has “decided to be nicer to consumers in order to stop them from demanding their right to repair,” according to Motherboard. Slashdot reader Jason Koebler shared this article:

It’s increasingly looking like Apple can no longer ignore the repair insurgency that’s been brewing: The right to repair movement is winning, and Apple’s behavior is changing. In the last few months, Apple has made political, design, and customer service decisions that suggest the right to repair movement is having a real impact on the company’s operations…

Apple has repeatedly made small concessions to its customers on the issues that Repair.org and the larger repair community have decided to highlight. The question is whether these concessions are going to be enough to satiate customers who want their devices to be easily repairable and upgradable, and whether the right to repair movement can convince those people to continue demanding fair treatment.
The article notes that at least 12 U.S. states are still considering “fair repair” laws, which would force Apple to sell replacement parts to both independent repair shops and the general public.

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Posted by amiller in apple, Blog