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AT&T Uses Forced Arbitration To Overcharge Customers, Senators Say

AT&T Uses Forced Arbitration To Overcharge Customers, Senators Say

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Five Democratic US senators allege that AT&T’s use of forced arbitration clauses has helped the company charge higher prices than the ones it advertises to customers. The senators pointed to a CBS News investigation that described “more than 4,000 complaints against AT&T and [subsidiary] DirecTV related to deals, promotions and overcharging in the past two years.” But customers have little recourse because they are forced to settle disputes with AT&T in arbitration, according to Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), and Edward Markey (D-Mass.). “Forced arbitration provisions in telecommunications contracts erode Americans’ ability to seek justice in the courts by forcing them into a privatized system that is inherently biased in favor of providers and which offers virtually no way to challenge a biased outcome,” the senators wrote in a letter yesterday to AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson. “Forced arbitration requires consumers to sign away their constitutional right to hold providers accountable in court just to access modern-day essentials like mobile phone, Internet, and pay-TV services.” Forced arbitration provisions such as AT&T’s also “include a class action waiver; language which strips consumers of the right to band together with other consumers to challenge a provider’s widespread wrongdoing,” they wrote.

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Posted by amiller in att, Blog
ESR Shares A Forgotten 'Roots Of Open Source' Moment From 1984

ESR Shares A Forgotten 'Roots Of Open Source' Moment From 1984

Eric S. Raymond recently documented one of the first public calls for free software, which happened immediately after AT&T’s fateful decision commercialize Unix:
[I]n October 1984 I was in a crowd of people watching a presentation by a woman from Bell Labs describing the then-new getopt(3) library, written by AT&T as a way to regularize the processing of command-line arguments in C programs… Everybody thought this was a fine idea, and several people asked questions probing whether AT&T was going to let anyone else use the getopt code they had written. These questions related to the general anxiety about Unix source code distributions drying up. Frustration mounted as the woman gave evasive answers which seemed to add up to “No, we refuse to commit to allowing general access to this code.” Which seemed to confirm everyone’s worst fears about what was going to happen to Unix source code access in general. At which point Henry Spencer stands up and says (not in these exact words) “I will write and share a conforming implementation.” — and got a cheer from the assembled.

If you’re thinking “That’s not a big deal, we do this sort of thing all the time,” my actual point is that in October 1984 this was indeed a big deal. It took an actual imaginative leap for Henry Spencer to, in effect, say “Screw AT&T and its legalisms and evasions, if they’re going to cut off source access we hackers are gonna do it for ourselves”… [H]e got an actual cheer exactly because he was pushing forward, exposing the possibility of doing not just small projects and demos and quirky little tools but at competing with the likes of AT&T itself at software production.

Raymond also remembers this as an important moment for him. “I was a young, unknown programmer then — just 27, still figuring out what I wanted. I watched Henry make that promise. I heard the cheer, and felt the change in the air as culturally, we realized what the solution to AT&T fscking us over had to be. And I thought ‘I want to be like that guy.'”

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Posted by amiller in att, Blog
About 37,000 AT&T Workers Go On Three-Day Strike

About 37,000 AT&T Workers Go On Three-Day Strike

Roughly 37,000 AT&T workers — less than 14 percent of the company’s total workforce — began a three-day strike on Friday after failing to reach an agreement with the No. 2 U.S. wireless carrier over new contracts. Reuters reports: This is the first time that AT&T wireless workers are on strike, which could result in closed retail stores during the weekend, according to the Communications Workers of America (CWA) union. The workers on strike are members of the CWA. The workers are demanding wage increases that cover rising healthcare costs, job security against outsourcing, affordable healthcare and a fair scheduling policy. Slightly over half of the workers on strike are part of the wireless segment and the rest wireline workers, including a small number of DirecTV technicians, AT&T spokesman Marty Richter told Reuters. The CWA had said on Wednesday that wireless workers across 36 states and Washington, D.C. would walk-off their jobs if an agreement was not reached by Friday 3 p.m. ET.

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Posted by amiller in att, Blog
AT&T To Roll Out 5G Network That's Not Actually 5G

AT&T To Roll Out 5G Network That's Not Actually 5G

AT&T announced plans to deliver what it’s calling the “5G Evolution” network to more than 20 markets by the end of the year. While the company is “using some wordsmithing to deliver to you faster internet speeds,” it’s important to note that this is not actually a real 5G network. Yahoo reports: 5G still has years of development and testing before it will be rolled out across the U.S. So don’t let AT&T’s use of “5G” make you think that the next-generation wireless standard has arrived. In reality, the 5G AT&T is talking about is a bumped-up version of its 4G LTE to help it bridge the gap until the real 5G, with its ultra-fast speeds and better bandwidth, is rolled out. It’s also important to note that AT&T won’t offer its 5G Evolution technology to all of its customers initially. In fact, it’s currently only available in Austin, TX, and the company plans to extend it to Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and other big markets in the coming months. If you’re in a smaller metro market, you’ll be out of luck. Perhaps the biggest limitation, and the reason few people will likely have the chance to actually use the 5G Evolution, is that AT&T is restricting it to select devices — specifically, the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+. While that’s great if you have one of those particular phones in one of the specific cities where AT&T’s faster service exists, it’s not so great if you’re using another device.

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Posted by amiller in att, Blog
AT&T Brings Fiber To Rich Areas While the Rest Are Stuck On DSL, Study Finds

AT&T Brings Fiber To Rich Areas While the Rest Are Stuck On DSL, Study Finds

According to a new study from UC Berkeley’s Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, AT&T has been focused on deploying fiber-to-the-home in the higher-income neighborhoods of California, giving wealthy people access to gigabit internet while others are stuck with DSL internet that doesn’t even meet state and federal broadband standards. Ars Technica reports: California households with access to AT&T’s fiber service have a median income of $94,208, according to “AT&T’s Digital Divide in California,” in which the Haas Institute analyzed Federal Communications Commission data from June 2016. The study was funded by the Communications Workers of America, an AT&T workers’ union that’s been involved in contentious negotiations with the company. By contrast, the median household income is $53,186 in California neighborhoods where AT&T provides only DSL, with download speeds typically ranging from 768kbps to 6Mbps. At the low end, that’s less than 1 percent of the gigabit speeds offered by AT&T’s fiber service. The median income in areas with U-verse VDSL, which ranges from 12Mbps to 75Mbps, is $67,021. In 4.1 million California households, representing 42.8 percent of AT&T’s California service area, AT&T’s fastest speeds fell short of the federal broadband definition of 25Mbps downloads and 3Mbps uploads, the report said.

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Posted by amiller in att, Blog
AT&T Receives $6.5 Billion To Build Wireless Network For First Responders

AT&T Receives $6.5 Billion To Build Wireless Network For First Responders

The First Responder Network, FirstNet, an independent arm of the Department of Commerce, has awarded a contract to AT&T to build a nationwide wireless broadband network to better equip first responders. “FirstNet will provide 20MHz of high-value, telecommunications spectrum and success-based payments of $6.5 billion over the next five years to support the network buildout,” AT&T said in its announcement. Reuters reports: The effort to set up a public safety network was triggered by communications failures during the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, when first responders were unable to effectively communicate as they used different technologies and networks. The FirstNet network will help emergency medical personnel, firefighters and police officers communicate vital information on one single network in real time, as opposed to using thousands of separate, incompatible systems. The rollout of the network, which will cover will cover all states, five U.S. territories and the District of Columbia, will begin later this year, AT&T said on Thursday. AT&T will spend about $40 billion over the period of the 25-year agreement to build, operate and maintain the network.

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Posted by amiller in att, Blog
AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member

AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member

From a press release: The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member. This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors. Chris Rice, senior vice president of AT&T Labs, joins The Linux Foundation Board of Directors and was also recently selected as the ONAP chairman. “Open source is crucial to AT&T’s software transformation,” said Chris Rice, chairman of ONAP and senior vice president of AT&T Labs. “So, it was a natural decision for us to join The Linux Foundation. SDN is helping us meet performance, capital spending and efficiency goals and we expect continued benefits. But more so, we recognize that the open source community accelerates innovation. We’re excited to work with The Linux Foundation and its members to promote a globally accepted platform for SDN and NFV technologies.”

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Posted by amiller in att, Blog