australia

Auto Added by WPeMatico

Roadside Cameras Infected with WannaCry Virus Invalidate 8,000 Traffic Tickets

Roadside Cameras Infected with WannaCry Virus Invalidate 8,000 Traffic Tickets

Long-time Slashdot reader nri tipped us off to a developing story in Victoria, Australia. Yahoo News reports:
Victoria Police officials announced on Saturday, June 24, they were withdrawing all speed camera infringement notices issued statewide from June 6 after a virus in the cameras turned out to be more widespread than first thought. “That does not mean they [the infringement notices] won’t not be re-issued,” Assistant Commissioner Doug Fryer told reporters, explaining that he wants to be sure the red light and speed cameras were working correctly. Acting Deputy Commissioner Ross Guenther told reporters on Friday that 55 cameras had been exposed to the ransomware virus, but they’ve now determined 280 cameras had been exposed. The cameras are not connected to the internet, but a maintenance worker unwittingly connected a USB stick with the virus on it to the camera system on June 6.
Fryer said that about 1643 tickets would be withdrawn — up from the 590 that police had announced on Friday — and another five and a half thousand tickets pending in the system would be embargoed. Fryer said he was optimistic the 7500 to 8000 tickets affected could be re-issued, but for now police would not issue new tickets until police had reviewed the cameras to ensure they were functioning properly… The “WannaCry” malware caused the cameras to continually reboot, Fryer said. Fryer said there was no indication the malware had caused inaccurate radar readings, but police were being “over cautious” to maintain public faith in the system.

Last week Victoria’s Police Minister was “openly furious” with the private camera operator, saying the group hadn’t notified the relevant authorities about the infection.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
Australian Officials Want Encryption Laws To Fight 'Terrorist Messaging'

Australian Officials Want Encryption Laws To Fight 'Terrorist Messaging'

An anonymous reader quotes Ars Technica:
Two top Australian government officials said Sunday that they will push for “thwarting the encryption of terrorist messaging” during an upcoming meeting next week of the so-called “Five Eyes” group of English-speaking nations that routinely share intelligence… According to a statement released by Attorney General George Brandis, and Peter Dutton, the country’s top immigration official, Australia will press for new laws, pressure private companies, and urge for a new international data sharing agreement amongst the quintet of countries… “Within a short number of years, effectively, 100 per cent of communications are going to use encryption,” Brandis told Australian newspaper The Age recently. “This problem is going to degrade if not destroy our capacity to gather and act upon intelligence unless it’s addressed”… Many experts say, however, that any method that would allow the government access even during certain situations would weaken overall security for everyone.
America’s former American director of national intelligence recently urged Silicon Valley to “apply that same creativity, innovation to figuring out a way that both the interests of privacy as well as security can be guaranteed.” Though he also added, “I don’t know what the answer is. I’m not an IT geek, but I just don’t think we’re in a very good place right now.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
Movie Piracy Cost Australian Network 'Hundreds of Millions of Dollars'

Movie Piracy Cost Australian Network 'Hundreds of Millions of Dollars'

Film television piracy and illegal downloads are partly to blame for Australian broadcaster Ten Network’s woes, according to Village Roadshow co-chief executive Graham Burke. From a report: He said piracy had cost Ten “hundreds of millions of dollars” in potential advertising revenue because of lower ratings resulting from pirated versions of films supplied by 21st Century Fox under an onerous output deal with the Hollywood studio. He said copies of Fox’s Leonardo DiCaprio movie The Revenant and The Peanuts Movie were stolen last year and shared illegally via a piracy website. “Piracy is a much bigger channel and an illicit economy than the three main commercial networks combined. It is ripping off viewers from legitimate, taxpaying enterprises,” Mr Burke said. “The product that Ten is buying from 21st Century Fox and is now arriving have been pirated out of sight.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
How Australia Bungled Its $36 Billion High-Speed Internet Rollout

How Australia Bungled Its $36 Billion High-Speed Internet Rollout

Not very pleased with your internet speeds? Think about the people Down Under. Australia’s “bungled” National Broadband Network (NBN) has been used as a “cautionary tale” for other countries to take note of. Despite the massive amount of money being pumped into the NBN, the New York Times reports, the internet speeds still lagged behind the US, most of western Europe, Japan and South Korea — even Kenya. The article highlights that Australia was the first country where a national plan to cover every house or business was considered and this ambitious plan was hampered by changes in government and a slow rollout (Editor’s note: the link could be paywalled; alternative source), partly because of negotiations with Telstra about the fibre installation. From the report: Australia, a wealthy nation with a widely envied quality of life, lags in one essential area of modern life: its internet speed. Eight years after the country began an unprecedented broadband modernization effort that will cost at least 49 billion Australian dollars, or $36 billion, its average internet speed lags that of the United States, most of Western Europe, Japan and South Korea. In the most recent ranking of internet speeds by Akamai, a networking company, Australia came in at an embarrassing No. 51, trailing developing economies like Thailand and Kenya. For many here, slow broadband connections are a source of frustration and an inspiration for gallows humor. One parody video ponders what would happen if an American with a passion for Instagram and streaming “Scandal” were to switch places with an Australian resigned to taking bathroom breaks as her shows buffer. The article shares this anecdote: “Hundreds of thousands of people from around the world have downloaded Hand of Fate, an action video game made by a studio in Brisbane, Defiant Development. But when Defiant worked with an audio designer in Melbourne, more than 1,000 miles away, Mr. Jaffit knew it would be quicker to send a hard drive by road than to upload the files, which could take several days.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
IT Contractors In Australia Are Not Being Paid Due To Dispute With Payroll Service

IT Contractors In Australia Are Not Being Paid Due To Dispute With Payroll Service

New submitter evolutionary writes: Plutus Payroll, an Australian payroll company, is refusing to pay contractors due to a dispute with companies using their services. Around 1,000 IT workers are unable to receive payment for services rendered. One may ask, “Where are the companies who actually hired the IT workers?” The Register reports: “This story starts with Australia’s employment laws, which see lots of contractors officially employed by recruitment companies or payroll companies. The company at which the contractor works likes this arrangement as it means they don’t have to put such people on their books. Recruitment companies and payroll companies charge for the service. Contractors generally like the convenience of having one employer even though they hop from gig to gig. The system requires fluid payments. Companies who hire contractors pay the recruiter, which either pays contractors direct or pays the payroll company contractors prefer. If the cash stops flowing, contractors get crunched. That’s what’s happened to around 1,000 contractors who elected to use Plutus as their paymasters: the company says it is in the midst of a completely unexplained ‘dispute’ that leaves it unable to pay contractors, or receive money from recruitment companies, but is still solvent. The Register has checked with the bank that Plutus clients say sends them their money — the bank says it is aware of no dispute. One possible reason for the mess is that Plutus did not charge for its services. How it made money is therefore a mystery. Another scenario concerns the company’s recent acquisition: perhaps its new owners are being denied access to some service Plutus could access as a standalone company. Plutus is saying nothing of substance about the situation. A spokesperson tells us the company deeply regrets the situation but won’t divulge anything about the dispute and has offered no details about when contractors can expect resolution.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
Australia Wants ISPs To Protect Customers From Viruses

Australia Wants ISPs To Protect Customers From Viruses

An anonymous reader quotes Sopho’s Naked Security blog:
In a column in The West Australian, Dan Tehan, Australia’s cybersecurity minister, wrote: “Just as we trust banks to hold our money, just as we trust doctors with our health, in a digital age we need to be able to trust telecommunications companies to protect our information from threats.” A companion news article in the same newspaper cited Tehan as arguing that “the onus is on telecommunications companies to develop products to stop their customers being infected with viruses”…
Tehan’s government roles include assisting the prime minister on cybersecurity, so folks throughout Australia perked up when he said all this. However, it’s not clear if there’s an actual plan behind Tehan’s observations — or if there is, whether it will be backed by legal mandates… Back home in Australia, some early reactions to the possibility of any new government interference weren’t kind. In iTWire, Sam Varghese said, “Dan Tehan has just provided the country with adequate reasons as to why he should not be allowed anywhere near any post that has anything to do with online security.”
The West Australian also reports Australia’s prime minister met telecommunications companies this week, “where he delivered the message the Government expected them to do more to shut dodgy sites and scams,” saying the government will review current legislation to “remove any roadblocks that may be preventing the private sector and government from delivering such services.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
This is Why Australia Hasn't Had a Recession in Over 25 Years

This is Why Australia Hasn't Had a Recession in Over 25 Years

Australia is close to seizing the global crown for the longest streak of economic growth thanks to a mixture of policy guile and outrageous fortune. From a report: While growth is being underpinned by population gains and resource exports to China, failure to spur productivity has meant stagnant living standards and electoral discontent; a property bubble fueled by record-low interest rates has driven household debt to levels that threaten financial stability; and a timid government facing political gridlock could lose the nation’s prized AAA rating as early as May because of spiraling budget deficits. Australia’s last recession — defined locally as two straight quarters of contraction — occurred in 1991 and was a devastating conclusion to eight years of reform designed to create an open, flexible and competitive economy. But it also proved cathartic, paving the way for a low-inflation, productivity-driven expansion. As momentum started waning, China’s re-emergence as a pre-eminent global economic power sent demand for Australian resources skyrocketing, helping shield the nation from the worst of the global financial crisis. But the post-crisis return of the boom proved ephemeral, failing to boost government coffers and pushing the local currency higher, eroding competitiveness and driving another nail into the coffin of a fading manufacturing sector.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
World's Largest Dinosaur Footprints Discovered In Western Australia

World's Largest Dinosaur Footprints Discovered In Western Australia

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: The largest known dinosaur footprints have been discovered in Western Australia, including 1.7 meter prints left by gigantic herbivores. Until now, the biggest known dinosaur footprint was a 106cm track discovered in the Mongolian desert and reported last year. At the new site, along the Kimberley shoreline in a remote region of Western Australia, paleontologists discovered a rich collection of dinosaur footprints in the sandstone rock, many of which are only visible at low tide. The prints, belonging to about 21 different types of dinosaur, are also thought to be the most diverse collection of prints in the world. Steve Salisbury, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Queensland told ABC News: “We’ve got several tracks up in that area that are about 1.7 meters long. So most people would be able to fit inside tracks that big, and they indicate animals that are probably around 5.3 to 5.5 meters at the hip, which is enormous.” “It is extremely significant, forming the primary record of non-avian dinosaurs in the western half the continent and providing the only glimpse of Australia’s dinosaur fauna during the first half of the early Cretaceous period,” he said. The findings were reported in the Memoir of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. The largest tracks belonged to sauropods, huge Diplodocus-like herbivores with long necks and tails. The scientists also discovered tracks from about four different types of ornithopod dinosaurs (two-legged herbivores) and six types of armored dinosaurs, including Stegosaurs, which had not previously been seen in Australia. At the time the prints were left, 130m years ago, the area was a large river delta and dinosaurs would have traversed wet sandy areas between surrounding forests.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog
Is Australia Becoming A Cashless Society?

Is Australia Becoming A Cashless Society?

Australia’s Reserve Bank will roll out an instantaneous money-transferring technology later this year, “which will push Australia even further towards being a cashless society,” according to ABC. An anonymous reader quotes their report:
In 2014, 12 financial institutions signed up to build the “New Payment Platform,” partly as a way of bringing Australia up to speed with other countries that are ahead in the race to becoming completely cashless. Sweden is on track to become the world’s first completely cashless economy, and just last November India got rid of its highest denomination bills, effectively eliminating 90 per cent of its paper money… The “New Payment Platform” will mean money can be transferred almost instantaneously, even when the payer and payee are members of different banks.

“It’s estimated that somewhere between about $3.5 and $5 billion in Australia every year is lost in tax revenue due to the sort of cash economy,” says an economics professor at the University of New South Wales, who predicts Australia could be cash-free by 2020. The Australian Payments Association reports that over 75% of the country’s face-to-face payments are already tap-and-go, and ATM withdrawals have sunk to a 15-year low.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in australia, Blog