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A Colorado Group Wants To Ban Smartphones For Kids

A Colorado Group Wants To Ban Smartphones For Kids

An anonymous reader quotes the AP:
Colorado officials have cleared the language of a proposed ballot measure that would establish the nation’s first legal limits on buying smartphones for children. Backers of the move to forbid the sale of smartphones to children younger than 13 would now need about 300,000 voter signatures for the proposal to make the 2018 ballot. The ban would require cellphone retailers to ask customers about the age of the primary user of a smartphone and submit monthly reports to the Colorado Department of Revenue on adhering to the requirement. Retailers who sell a phone for use by a youngster could be fined $500, after a warning.
A Denver-area dad is leading the campaign — a board certified anesthesiologist who says children change when they get a cellphone. “They go from being outgoing, energetic, interested in the world and happy, to reclusive. They want to spend all their time in their room. They lose interest in outside activities.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
We Could Have Had Cellphones Four Decades Earlier

We Could Have Had Cellphones Four Decades Earlier

_Sharp’r_ writes: Professor Thomas Hazlett of Clemson University analyzed the history of wireless spectrum and concluded the technology was known and available for cellphones in the 40s, but there was no spectrum available. Based on assumptions cellphones would always be luxury goods without mass appeal, significant spectrum for divisible cellular networks wasn’t legally usable until the early 80s. Instead, the unused spectrum was reserved for the future expansion of broadcast TV to channels 70-83. Here’s an excerpt from the report: “When AT&T wanted to start developing cellular in 1947, the FCC rejected the idea, believing that spectrum could be best used by other services that were not ‘in the nature of convenience or luxury.’ This view — that this would be a niche service for a tiny user base — persisted well into the 1980s. ‘Land mobile,’ the generic category that covered cellular, was far down on the FCC’s list of priorities. In 1949, it was assigned just 4.7 percent of the spectrum in the relevant range. Broadcast TV was allotted 59.2 percent, and government uses got one-quarter.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
New iOS 11 Settings Will Stop Apps From Tracking Your Location

New iOS 11 Settings Will Stop Apps From Tracking Your Location

An anonymous reader quotes The Verge:
Apple is giving users the option to enable much stricter location rules with iOS 11, according to MacRumors. The company began this effort last year by adding a new option to iOS 10 that grants apps access to your location only while they’re actively being used. But this “while in use” setting is up to developers to actually enable. The vast majority of popular apps did integrate that new feature. Others, however — Uber chief among them — still force iPhone users to choose between always or never providing location data. The latter choice breaks the functionality of an app like Uber, leaving customers with really only one option. Apple seems poised to eliminate this false choice in iOS 11 by making the “while in use” restriction available for every app.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
No, Your Phone Didn't Ring. So Why Voice Mail From a Telemarketer?

No, Your Phone Didn't Ring. So Why Voice Mail From a Telemarketer?

Slashdot reader midwestsilentone tipped us off to a growing problem. Lifehacker reports:
New technology allows telemarketers to leave ringless voicemail messages, and it’s a method that’s gaining traction. While there are laws to regulate businesses when they call consumers, some groups argue that ringless voicemail shouldn’t count. The New York Times reports,”ringless voicemail providers and pro-business groups…argue that these messages should not qualify as calls and, therefore, should be exempt from consumer protection laws that ban similar types of telephone marketing”… After receiving a petition from a ringless voicemail provider, the Federal Trade Commission has started to collect public comments on this issue. So what can you do about it? First, you can head here to leave your public comment and if you’re getting these voicemails, you can file a complaint with the FCC here.
Presumably that only applies if you’re in the U.S. But I’d be curious to hear how many Slashdot readers have experienced this.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
Police In Oklahoma Have Cracked Hundreds of People's Cell Phones

Police In Oklahoma Have Cracked Hundreds of People's Cell Phones

An anonymous reader shares an excerpt from a report via Motherboard: Mobile phone forensic extraction devices have been a law enforcement tool for years now, and the number of agencies using them is only rising. As part of an ongoing investigation, we have finally been able to turn up some usage logs of this equipment, from Tulsa Police Department, and Tucson Police Department. While the logs do not list the cause of the crime or any other notes about why the phone was being searched, it does list the make of the phone, the date, and the type of extraction. First, let’s go over what extraction devices are being used here. Tucson PD opted for the brand that is arguably the worldwide leader in mobile device forensics, the Israeli company Cellebrite. Tulsa Police Department however opted for a few different models — they purchased two different password breakers from Teel Technologies in 2015, and in March 2016 gave about $1,500 to Susteen for their SecureView extraction device (SecureView was the product Susteen created when the FBI requested they create a more advanced extraction device for them). It does its work instantly, and has an incredible reach into a phone’s data. They renewed this contract in 2017. In August 2016 they also purchased the Detective extraction device from Oxygen Forensics. Oxygen is much less common than Cellebrite, from what we have found. The kicker really is how often these are being used — it is simply really hard to believe that out of the 783 times Tulsa Police used their extraction devices, all were for crimes in which it was necessary to look at all of the phone’s data. Even for the 316 times Tucson PD used theirs in the last year, it is still a real stretch to think that some low-level non-violent offenders weren’t on the receiving end. There are some days where the devices were used multiple times — Tulsa used theirs eight times on February 28th of this year, eight again on April 3rd, and a whopping 14 times on May 10th 2016. That is a whole lot of data that Tulsa was able to tap into, and we aren’t even able to understand the why.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
Republicans Want To Leave You Voicemail — Without Ever Ringing Your Cellphone

Republicans Want To Leave You Voicemail — Without Ever Ringing Your Cellphone

bricko quotes a report from Recode: The GOP’s leading campaign and fundraising arm, the Republican National Committee, has quietly thrown its support behind a proposal at the Federal Communications Commission that would pave the way for marketers to auto-dial consumers’ cellphones and leave them prerecorded voicemail messages — all without ever causing their devices to ring. Under current federal law, telemarketers and others, like political groups, aren’t allowed to launch robocall campaigns targeting cellphones unless they first obtain a consumer’s written consent. But businesses stress that it’s a different story when it comes to “ringless voicemail” — because it technically doesn’t qualify as a phone call in the first place. In their eyes, that means they shouldn’t need a customer or voter’s permission if they want to auto-dial mobile voicemail inboxes in bulk pre-made messages about a political candidate, product or cause. And they want the FCC to rule, once and for all, that they’re in the clear. Their argument, however, has drawn immense opposition from consumer advocates.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
Samsung's Galaxy S8 Active Looks Like a Rugged LG G6

Samsung's Galaxy S8 Active Looks Like a Rugged LG G6

The Wireless Power Consortium has released a leaked image of the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S8 Active. While it’s only one photo, the image shows a smartphone greatly resembling LG’s G6. The Verge reports: First, the display: the S8 Active won’t have curved edges, like the regular S8. The big question this year was what Samsung planned to do about the screen, since curved glass may be more susceptible to cracking, and Samsung seems to have decided the best option was to get rid of it altogether. Instead, the S8 Active has a flattened out look but retains the S8’s rounded corners, making the front of the phone look a lot like LG’s G6. Samsung seems to have made the bezels a little bit larger on the S8 Active, particularly on the sides. But overall, the front of the phone still seems to get fairly close to the nearly all-screen look of actual S8. The second thing this photo shows is that Samsung isn’t putting buttons back on the front of the phone. That’s not necessarily a huge surprise, but it’ll make the device a bit harder to handle when wet, since owners will be relying on the touchscreen. And finally, this photo reveals a bit of what Samsung is doing to make the phone rugged. All four of its corners bump out, suggesting they’ve been reinforced to absorb shock should the phone get dropped; it looks a lot like what Samsung has done in the past.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
UK Group Fights Arrest Over Refusing To Surrender Passwords At The Border

UK Group Fights Arrest Over Refusing To Surrender Passwords At The Border

An anonymous reader quotes The Guardian:
The human rights group Cage is preparing to mount a legal challenge to UK anti-terrorism legislation over a refusal to hand over mobile and laptop passwords to border control officials at air terminals, ports and international rail stations… The move comes after its international director, Muhammad Rabbani, a UK citizen, was arrested at Heathrow airport in November for refusing to hand over passwords. Rabbani, 35, has been detained at least 20 times over the past decade when entering the UK, under schedule 7 of terrorism legislation that provides broad search powers, but this was the first time he had been arrested… On previous occasions, when asked for his passwords, he said he had refused and eventually his devices were returned to him and he was allowed to go. But there was a new twist this time: when he refused to reveal his passwords, he was arrested under schedule 7 provisions of the terrorism act and held overnight at Heathrow Polar Park police station before being released on bail. He expects to be charged on Wednesday.

Rabbani “argues that the real objective…is not stopping terrorists entering the UK, but as a tool to build up a huge data bank on thousands of UK citizens.” And his position drew support from Jim Killock, executive director of the UK-based Open Rights Group. “Investigations should take place when there is actual suspicion, and the police should be able to justify their actions on that basis, rather than using wide-ranging powers designed for border searches.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
Majority of US Households Now Cellphone-Only, Government Says

Majority of US Households Now Cellphone-Only, Government Says

The National Center for Health Statistics has released a report that says, for the first time in history, U.S. households with landlines are now in the minority. Network World reports: The second 6 months of 2016 was the first time that a majority of American homes had only wireless telephones. Preliminary results from the July-December 2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) indicate that 50.8% of American homes did not have a landline telephone but did have at least one wireless telephone (also known as cellular telephones, cell phones, or mobile phones) — an increase of 2.5 percentage points since the second 6 months of 2015. Young adults (25-34) and those who rent are most likely to live wireless-only, as 70 percent of that demographic lives with a landline.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones
Neowin: Microsoft's Windows Phone Business 'Is Dead'

Neowin: Microsoft's Windows Phone Business 'Is Dead'

An anonymous reader quote Neowin:
If you’ve been expecting Microsoft to issue a press release formally announcing the end of its Windows phone business, you’re probably hoping for a bit too much. But make no mistake: its phone hardware business is dead. RIP-dead. Send-flowers-dead. Worm-food-dead. Some fans, and even some in the media, have consistently refused to acknowledge this, despite the clear signs in recent quarters. Now, Microsoft’s own figures, and its statements regarding its phone division, should make it irrefutably clear that there is no life left in its Windows phone business.
During the quarter ending in December, Microsoft’s phone revenue dropped to just $200 million, which included some sales of feature phones, before the company completed its sale of that business unit to Foxconn in November. That figure has now dropped to virtually nothing… Today, as Microsoft published its earnings report for Q3 FY2017, it revealed that its “Phone revenue declined $730 million”. Based on its earlier financial disclosures, that means the company’s phone hardware revenue fell to just $5 million for the entire quarter ending March 31, 2017. During Microsoft’s earnings call today, its chief financial officer, Amy Hood, acknowledged this, stating that there was “no material phone revenue this quarter”. The outlook for the next few months is similarly bleak, as Hood predicted “negligible revenue from Phone” in the coming quarter.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, cellphones