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Google Releases Chrome 59

Google Releases Chrome 59

An anonymous reader writes: Google has launched Chrome 59 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Among the additions are native notifications on macOS, settings being revamped to follow Material Design, the Image Capture API, Headless Chrome, and more service worker improvements. You can update to the latest version now using the browser’s built-in silent updater or download it directly from google.com/chrome.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome
Chrome To Deprecate PNaCl, Embrace New WebAssembly Standard

Chrome To Deprecate PNaCl, Embrace New WebAssembly Standard

An anonymous reader quotes Tom’s Hardware
Google announced that its Portable Native Client (PNaCl) solution for making native code run inside the browser will be replaced by the new cross-browser web standard called WebAssembly… Even though Google open sourced PNaCl, as part of the Chromium project, Mozilla ended up creating its own alternative called “asm.js,” an optimized subset of JavaScript that could also compile to the assembly language. Mozilla thought that asm.js was far simpler to implement and required no API compatibility, as PNaCl did. As these projects seemed to go nowhere, with everyone promoting their own standard, the major browser vendors seem to have eventually decided on creating WebAssembly. WebAssembly can give web apps near-native performance, offers support for more CPU features, and is simpler to implement in browsers and use by developers.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome
Even For Businesses, Chrome Is The Top Browser

Even For Businesses, Chrome Is The Top Browser

An anonymous reader shares Computerworld’s interview with David Michael Smith of Gartner.

“Most enterprises still have a ‘standard’ browser, and most of the time, that’s something from Microsoft. These days it’s IE11. But we’ve found that people actually use Chrome more than IE… It’s the most-used browser in enterprise,” he said… IE retains a sizable share — Smith called it “a significant presence” — largely because it’s still required in most companies. “There are a lot of [enterprise] applications that only work in IE, because [those apps] use plug-ins,” Smith said, ticking off examples like Adobe Flash, Java and Microsoft’s own Silverlight. “Anything that requires an ActiveX control needs IE.” Many businesses have adopted the two-prong strategy that Gartner and others began recommending years ago: Keep a “legacy” browser to handle older sites, services and web apps, but offer another for everything else…

Chrome, said Smith, is now the “overwhelming choice” as the modern enterprise browser… Smith wasn’t optimistic that Edge would supplant Chrome, even when Windows 10 is widely deployed on corporate computers in the next few years. “Edge certainly will have opportunities” once Windows 10 is the enterprise-standard OS, “but I would say that Chrome has a lot of momentum, largely for the fact that it is so popular on the internet.”

While a year ago Chrome and Microsoft’s browsers both held 41% of the browser market share, now Chrome holds 59% to just 24% for both IE and Edge combined.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome
Should You Leave Google Chrome For the Opera Browser?

Should You Leave Google Chrome For the Opera Browser?

mspohr shares a report written by Jason Koebler via Motherboard who makes the case for why you should break up with Chrome and switch to the Opera browser: Over the last few years, I have grown endlessly frustrated with Chrome’s resource management, especially on MacOS. Admittedly, I open too many tabs, but I’d wager that a lot of you do, too. With Chrome, my computer crawls to complete unusability multiple times a day. After one too many times of having to go into Activity Monitor to find that one single Chrome tab is using several gigs of RAM, I decided enough was enough. I switched to Opera, a browser I had previously thought was only for contrarians. This, after previous dalliances with Safari and Firefox left me frustrated. Because Opera is also based on Blink, I almost never run into a website, plugin, script, or video that doesn’t work flawlessly on it. In fact, Opera works almost exactly like Chrome, except without the resource hogging that makes me want to throw my computer against a brick wall. This is exactly the point, according to Opera spokesperson Jan Standal: “What we’re doing is an optimized version of Chrome,” he said. “Web developers optimize most for the browser with the biggest market share, which happens to be Chrome. We benefit from the work of that optimization.”

Slashdot reader mspohr adds: “I should note that this has also been my experience. I have a 2010 MacBook, which I was ready to trash since it had become essentially useless, coming to a grinding halt daily. I tried Opera and it’s like I have a new computer. I never get the spinning wheel of death. (Also, the built-in ad blocker and VPN are nice.)” What has been your experience with Google Chrome and/or Opera? Do you prefer one over the other?

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome
#GraciasALosProfes: Celebrating Teacher Appreciation Day in Mexico

#GraciasALosProfes: Celebrating Teacher Appreciation Day in Mexico

Today is Teacher Appreciation Day, or Día del Maestro, in Mexico, where 30 GEG (Google Educator Groups) leaders are at the helm of the movement to transform education through technology in Latin America. Our Mexican GEG leaders empower their fellow teachers to harness tech to meet students’ needs. We are amazed at the innovative and inspiring ways these teachers and leaders are building their movement across Mexico—from Guadalajara to Mexico City to Monterrey.

In Quéretaro, Nay Belaunzaran thought up an idea to scale the impact of tech across generations by mobilizing children to teach their parents about the internet. Under Nay’s leadership, primary school students prepare classes for their parents about G Suite for Education where the parents learn to jot their thoughts down in Docs, build presentations in Slides, and communicate with teachers through Google Classroom. Galvanizing students to bridge the generational tech literacy gap has made it easier for parents to stay engaged with kids’ schools.

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Nay connected with fellow teachers from all over Latin America at last year’s Google for Education Certified Innovators Summit in Mexico City.

In Tijuana, Gabriela Torres Beltrán has paved the way for dozens of her students to become Google Certified Educators themselves. By building a community of future teachers who keep innovation and technology top of mind, Gabriela is making her mark on the future of education in her community.  “Seeing the smile of satisfaction on their faces as they explore ways to implement technology in class is extremely inspiring,” she shared with an inspired smile of her own.

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Verónica stays after class on most days, providing extra support for students whose curiosity extends beyond school hours.

In Verónica Nuñez Loyo’s classroom in Mexico City, students find themselves at the intersection of traditions of the past and technology of the future. She challenges her middle schoolers not only to research the history of Mexico, but to leverage the internet to share their learnings. Recently, Verónica’s  seventh grade class collaborated to create a multimedia presentation about the Axolotl, an endangered amphibian species endemic to Baja California. Technology was at the heart of the project, whether students were exploring the Náhuatl origin of the word “Axolotl” or investigating how portrayals of this “walking fish” have changed over time.

These are three of many educators who work tirelessly to ignite curiosity and give life to the ideas of Mexico’s rising generation. Which teachers inspire you? Today—and everyday—join us in celebrating the educators who dedicate their lives to working with students to create a more connected Latin America. #GraciasALosProfes.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome, Chromebooks, education, G Suite
Chrome For Android Now Lets You Save Web Pages For Reading Later

Chrome For Android Now Lets You Save Web Pages For Reading Later

Today, Google has introduced a series of improvements to Chrome for Android to make it easier to save content for offline access. The improvements will be made to the “Downloads” feature rolled out in December that allows you to save webpages, music and videos for offline access. TechCrunch reports: To download a web page previously, you would open Chrome’s menu in the top-right of the browser, then tap the “save” icon that’s located next to the star for bookmarking the site. You could then see all the content you had saved for offline access by tapping on “Downloads” from this same menu. Now, Google is adding more ways to save content, including a way to long press on a link the way you do when you want to open up a page in a new tab. The option to “Download Link” will appear on the pop-up screen you see after your press, below the options to open the page in a new tab or incognito tab. Google says this long press action will also work on its article suggestions on its New Tab page. This New Tab page will also include the articles you’ve already downloaded, which will be flagged with an offline badge.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome
Read web pages offline with Chrome on Android

Read web pages offline with Chrome on Android

Last year, we introduced the ability to download any webpage, so you can view the whole page completely offline. More than 45 million web pages are downloaded every week—and today we’re adding improvements to make it even easier to download pages.

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From left to right: New download link option, download page later button, offline badge

First, you can now long press on any link and select “Download link.” This feature is also available when you long press an article suggestion on the new tab page.

In addition, the next time you run into Chrome’s offline dinosaur, you’ll see the “Download Page Later” button. If you tap it, Chrome will automatically download the page for you when you get back online.

We’re also making it easier for you to get back to the content you’ve downloaded. When you open a new tab, you will see articles that you have downloaded tagged with a new offline badge.  We will also show a list of your recent downloads right on the page for easy access.

Now you’ll always have a ready-to-go list of pages or articles to read even if you are out of data for the month or lose the network in a dead zone. Update to the latest version of Chrome and tap the download icon on any page to get started.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome
Google To Auto-Migrate Some Users To 64-bit Chrome

Google To Auto-Migrate Some Users To 64-bit Chrome

Google says it will automatically upgrade the version of Chrome that some Windows users are running, in what it describes as a bet to improve stability, performance, and security. From a report on ZDNet: In a blog post on Tuesday, the search engine giant explained that Chrome users running 64-bit Windows with 4GB or more of memory will be automatically migrated to the 64-bit version of Chrome if they are running the 32-bit version.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome
Chrome Will Start Marking HTTP Sites In Incognito Mode As Non-Secure In October

Chrome Will Start Marking HTTP Sites In Incognito Mode As Non-Secure In October

Reader Krystalo writes: Google today announced the second step in its plan to mark all HTTP sites as non-secure in Chrome. Starting in October 2017, Chrome will mark HTTP sites with entered data and HTTP sites in Incognito mode as non-secure. With the release of Chrome 56 in January 2017, Google’s browser started marking HTTP pages that collect passwords or credit cards as “Not Secure” in the address bar. Since then, Google has seen a 23 percent reduction in the fraction of navigations to HTTP pages with password or credit card forms on Chrome for desktop. Chrome 62 (we’re currently on Chrome 58) will take this to the next level.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome
Even better translations in Chrome, with one tap

Even better translations in Chrome, with one tap

Half the world’s webpages are in English, but less than 15 percent of the global population speaks it as a primary or secondary language. It’s no surprise that Chrome’s built-in Translate functionality is one of the most beloved Chrome features. Every day Chrome users translate more than 150 million webpages with just one click or tap.

Last year, Google Translate introduced neural machine translation, which uses deep neural networks to translate entire sentences, rather than just phrases, to figure out the most relevant translation. Since then we’ve been gradually making these improvements available for Chrome’s built-in translation for select language pairs. The result is higher-quality, full-page translations that are more accurate and easier to read.

Today, neural machine translation improvement is coming to Translate in Chrome for nine more language pairs. Neural machine translation will be used for most pages to and from English for Indonesian and eight Indian languages: Bengali, Gujarati, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Punjabi, Tamil and Telugu. This means higher quality translations on pages containing everything from song lyrics to news articles to cricket discussions.

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From left: A webpage in Indonesian; the page translated into English without neural machine translation; the page translated into English with neural machine translation. As you can see, the translations after neural machine translation are more fluid and natural.

The addition of these nine languages brings the total number of languages enabled with neural machine translations in Chrome to more than 20. You can already translate to and from English for Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Thai, Turkish, Vietnamese, and one-way from Spanish to English.

We’ll bring neural machine translation to even more languages in the future. Until then, learn more about enabling Translate in Chrome in our help center.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Chrome, Translate