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Even Telecom Workers Don't Want To Talk On the Phone

Even Telecom Workers Don't Want To Talk On the Phone

An anonymous reader shares a report: Of the 1,000 Americans surveyed by Fundera, more than half said they prefer email, even though an often overflowing inbox has been proven to hinder productivity. Other methods of communicating paled in comparison. For instance, face-to-face conversations came in a distant second, preferred by only 15.8% of respondents, while phone calls came in at the bottom across 17 different industries. Even telecom workers don’t want to talk on the phone: 70% would prefer to use instant messages or email.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
Snapchat's New Snap Map Lets You Share Your Location With Friends

Snapchat's New Snap Map Lets You Share Your Location With Friends

Snapchat is expanding into the world of mapping. A new feature announced on Wednesday called Snap Maps will let the app’s 166 million users share their locations with each other, according to a company blog post. From a report: From the default camera view, you pinch with two fingers to zoom out and see the map. Friends who have opted into sharing their location through Snap Map (it’s off by default) will appear in Bitmoji form. You can share with select friends, all friends, or with no one if you pick “Ghost Mode.” Snapchat is very quick to note that your location is only updated when you open the app — so there shouldn’t be any background tracking to worry about.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
A 12-Month Campaign of Fake News To Influence Elections Costs $400K, Says Report

A 12-Month Campaign of Fake News To Influence Elections Costs $400K, Says Report

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bleeping Computer: A 77-page report released today by cyber-security firm Trend Micro explores the underground landscape of fake news, where anyone can buy influence and create artificial trends to serve personal interests. An examination of Chinese, Russian, Middle Eastern, and English-based underground fake news marketplaces reveals a wide range of services available on these portals. The report explores several websites where customers can purchase services ranging from “discrediting journalists” to “promoting street protests,” and from “stuffing online polls” to “manipulating a decisive course of action,” such as an election. According to researchers, the typical clients of such services are interested in warping the way others perceive reality. These services are usually used for character assassination, swaying political trends, or creating fake celebrities. Trend Micro has compiled a “fake news” price catalog in its report, which is imbedded in Bleeping Computer’s article. Some of the most expensive services include $200,000 for helping to instigate a street protest via fake news articles, $50,000 to discredit a journalist, and $400,000 to influence elections.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
FCC Can't Cap the Cost of Cross-State Prison Phone Calls, Court Rules

FCC Can't Cap the Cost of Cross-State Prison Phone Calls, Court Rules

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: The Federal Communications Commission does not have the authority to cap the cost of prison and jail phone calls within states, an appeals court ruled in a decision today, dealing a massive blow to inmates and their advocates who have spent years litigating caps on the cost of such calls. Over several years, the FCC, under Democratic leadership, moved to cap the cost of calls for inmates. Activists argued that prisoners were effectively being extorted by private companies charging exorbitant rates — a move that benefited private prisons and the states that got cuts of the revenue. Some of those states joined with companies in appealing the FCC’s rules. The agency first moved to cap rates across state lines, and then, later, within states. Today, the court ruled that the FCC had overstepped when it attempted to regulate the price of calls within states. In the majority opinion, the court left little wiggle room for advocates of price-capping, with the possible exception of the cross-state caps, which are a minority of calls made by inmates. The opinion vacated not only the agency’s proposed caps for in-state calls, but said the agency also lacked justification to require reports on video calling services. It also vacated a provision that would ban site commission payments.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
Someone Built a Tool To Get Congress' Browser History

Someone Built a Tool To Get Congress' Browser History

A software engineer in North Carolina has created a new plugin that lets website administrators monitor when someone accesses their site from an IP address associated with the federal government. It was created in part to protest a measure signed by President Trump in April that allows internet service providers to sell sensitive information about your online habits without needing your consent. Motherboard reports: A new tool created by Matt Feld, the founder of several nonprofits including Speak Together, could help the public get a sense of what elected officials are up to online. Feld, a software engineer working in North Carolina, created Speak Together to share “technical projects that could be used to reduce the opaqueness between government and people,” he told Motherboard over the phone. “It was born out of just me trying to get involved and finding the process to be confusing.” The tool lets website administrators track whether members of Congress, the Senate, White House staff, or Federal Communications Commission (FCC) staff are looking at their site. If you use Feld’s plug-in, you’ll be able to see whether someone inside government is reading your blog. You won’t be able to tell if President Trump viewed a web page, but you will be able to see that it was someone using an IP address associated with the White House. The tool works similarly to existing projects like CongressEdits, an automated Twitter account that tweets whenever a Wikipedia page is edited from IP addresses associated with Congress.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
Apple 'Error 53' Sting Operation Caught Staff Misleading Customers, Court Documents Allege

Apple 'Error 53' Sting Operation Caught Staff Misleading Customers, Court Documents Allege

AmiMoJo writes: “Australia’s consumer watchdog carried out a sting operation against Apple which it says caught staff repeatedly misleading iPhone customers about their legal rights to a free repair or replacement after a so-called ‘error 53’ malfunction, court documents reveal,” reports The Guardian. Error 53 refers to an error message that renders iPhones useless if third-party repairs are made. From the report: “The case, set to go to trial in mid-December, accuses Apple of wrongly telling customers they were not entitled to free replacements or repair if they had taken their devices to an unauthorized third-party repairer. That advice was allegedly given even where the repair — a screen replacement, for example — was not related to the fault. Apple has so far chosen to remain silent about the case brought by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC). But court documents obtained by Guardian Australia show the company has denied the ACCC’s allegations, saying it did not mislead or cause any harm to its Australian customers. The documents also show how the ACCC used undercover methods to investigate Apple. Investigators, posing as iPhone customers, called all 13 Apple retailers across Australia in June last year. They told Apple staff their iPhone speakers had stopped working after screens were replaced by a third party. Apple’s response was the same in each of the 13 calls, the ACCC alleges.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
After Bomb Threats, FCC Proposes Letting Police Unveil Anonymous Callers

After Bomb Threats, FCC Proposes Letting Police Unveil Anonymous Callers

Police should be allowed to unmask anonymous callers who have made serious threats over the phone, the Federal Communications Commission has proposed. From a report: The proposal would allow law enforcement, and potentially the person who’s been called, to learn the phone number of an anonymous caller if they receive a “serious and imminent” threat that poses “substantial risk to property, life, safety, or health.” Specifics are still up in the air. The FCC is asking (PDF), for instance, whether unveiled caller ID information should only be provided to law enforcement officials investigating a threat, to ensure that this exemption isn’t abused.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
Comcast Proves Need For Net Neutrality By Trying To Censor Advocacy Website

Comcast Proves Need For Net Neutrality By Trying To Censor Advocacy Website

Reader mrchaotica writes: As most Slashdot readers are probably aware, the FCC, under the direction of Trump-appointed chairman Ajit Pai, is trying to undo its 2015 decision to protect Net Neutrality (PDF) by classifying ISPs as common carriers. During the recent public comment period, the FCC’s website was flooded with pro-Net-Neutrality comments from actual people (especially those who heeded John Oliver’s call to arms) as well as anti-Net-Neutrality comments posted by bots using the names and addresses of people without their consent. The fake comments use boilerplate identical to that used in a 2010 press release by the conservative lobbying group Center for Individual Freedom (which is funded by Comcast, among other entities), but beyond that, the entities who perpetrated and funded the criminal acts have not been conclusively identified. In response to this brazen attempt to undermine the democratic process, the Internet freedom advocacy group Fight for the Future (FFTF) created the website Comcastroturf.com to call attention to the fraud and allow people to see if their identity had been misappropriated. Comcast, in a stunning display of its tone-deaf attitude towards free speech, has sent a cease-and-desist order to FFTF, claiming that Comcastroturf.com violates its “valuable intellectual property[sic].” According to the precedent set in Bosley Medical Institute, Inc. v. Kremer , websites created for the purpose of criticizing an organization can not be considered trademark infringement. As such, FFTF reportedly has no intention of taking down the site.”This is exactly why we need Title II net neutrality protections that ban blocking, throttling, and censorship,” said Evan Greer, campaign director of Fight for the Future, “If Ajit Pai’s plan is enacted, there would be nothing preventing Comcast from simply blocking sites like Comcastroturf.com that are critical of their corporate policies,” she added. “It also makes you wonder what Comcast is so afraid of? Are their lobbying dollars funding the astroturfing effort flooding the FCC with fake comments that we are encouraging Internet users to investigate?”Could there be a better example to illustrate why ensuring strong Net Neutrality protections by regulating ISPs as common carriers is so important?

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications
FCC Won't Release DDoS Logs, And Will Probably Honor Fake Comments

FCC Won't Release DDoS Logs, And Will Probably Honor Fake Comments

An anonymous reader quotes ZDNet on the alleged denial of service attack which blocked comments supporting net neutrality.
In a ZDNet interview, FCC chief information officer David Bray said that the agency would not release the logs, in part because the logs contain private information, such as IP addresses. In unprinted remarks, he said that the logs amounted to about 1 gigabyte per hour during the alleged attack… The log files showed that non-human [and cloud-based] bots submitted a flood of comments using the FCC’s API. The bot that submitted these comments sparked the massive uptick in internet traffic on the FCC by using the public API as a vehicle…
Bray’s comments further corroborate a ZDNet report (and others) that showed unknown anti-net neutrality spammers were behind the posting of hundreds of thousands of the same messages to the FCC’s website using people’s names and addresses without their consent — a so-called “astroturfing” technique — in an apparent attempt to influence the results of a public solicitation for feedback on net neutrality. Speaking to reporters last week, FCC chairman Ajit Pai hinted that the agency would likely honor those astroturfed comments, nonetheless.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, communications