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BenQ Zowie XL2546 e-Sports Monitor Review

It seems like many monitors are being marketed to consumers as “gaming monitors” with their flashy RGB lights, curved screens, and impressive specifications, but are these the type of monitors you want if you are a serious e-Sports player? From what we’ve gathered, probably not. Most professional e-Sports players do not use super large displays, curved screens, or even high resolutions. They are more concerned about performance and functionality. That is where the BenQ Zowie XL2546 e-Sports monitor comes in. This 24.5-inch TN panel had an HD (1920 x 1080) resolution, 240 Hz refresh rate, 1ms response time, and 320 cd/㎡ brightness. On top of that there are gaming-focused features like Zowie’s Dynamic Accuracy technology, Black eQualizer technology, an LCD frame that was designed to reduce light reflection from the screen, and even shields on the side of the monitor to eliminate distractions. Is this the ultimate monitor for the serious e-Sports player? Read on as we find out…

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Posted by amiller in BenQ, Blog, displays, e-Sports Monitor, Gaming Monitor, Monitor, Review, Reviews, ZOWIE, Zowie XL2546

1440p Monitors Could Be Using 4K Panels

A new report from German website Prad.de says that sources close to monitor panel manufactures have told them that the production cost of a 27″ 4K (3840 x 2160) is lower or at least equal to that of a 27″ QHD (2560 x 1440) panel. This causes monitor manufactures to use 4K panels in QHD monitors when panel supply is low or monitor demand is high.

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Posted by amiller in 1440p, 4K, All News, Blog, displays, Hardware News, Monitors, panels

New 4K 144 Hz Monitors use Blurry Chroma Subsampling

Display makers had to find a way to get these displays running at 4K 144 Hz, so what they came up with was chroma subsampling (YCbCr), which transmits the grayscale portion of the image at full resolution (3840×2160) and the color information at half the horizontal resolution (1920×2160).

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Posted by amiller in 144 Hz, 4K, All News, Blog, Chroma Subsampling, displays, Gaming Displays, Hardware News, Monitors

Benq Screenbar e-Reading Lamp Review

One thing that most of us do not think about when designing and setting up our PC Desk setup is lighting. Yes, you may want some RGB lights on your desk or behind your monitor, but real functional lighting is sort of an after-thought. Well Benq might have just the thing for you in their Screenbar e-Reading lamp, which is designed to sit on the top of your monitor and provide great lighting for your work space. It also solves problems that traditional lamps face like incorrect brightness, limited space, and screen reflection. Let’s take a look at the Screenbar from Benq and see if it is the ultimate lighting solution for our setup.

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Posted by amiller in BenQ, Benq Screenbar, Blog, Desk Lamp, displays, E-Reading Lamp, Lamp, light, Review, Reviews, Screenbar
Google and LG Unveil World's Highest-Resolution OLED On-Glass VR Display

Google and LG Unveil World's Highest-Resolution OLED On-Glass VR Display

A couple months ago, Road to VR reported that Google and LG were planning to reveal the “world’s highest-resolution OLED on-glass display” for virtual-reality headsets on May 22nd. Well, that day has arrived and the two companies unveiled that very display. Android Authority reports: As expected, the 4.3-inch OLED 18MP display has a resolution of 4,800 x 3,840. The display has a pixel density of 1,443PPI and a 120Hz refresh rate. Google and LG referred to it as the “world’s highest-resolution OLED on-glass display.” For comparison’s sake, the HTC Vive has two 3.6-inch displays with resolutions of 1,200 x 1,080. The higher-end HTC Vive Pro has two 3.5-inch displays with resolutions of 1,600 x 1,440. The Vive Pro maxes out at 615PPI, making this new LG panel about 57% better than HTC’s best offering. However, there’s already one display that’s better than anything on offer, and that’s your own vision. A person with great vision sees in an estimated resolution of 9,600 x 9,000 with a PPI density of 2,183. In other words, this new display from Google and LG is about half as good as our own eyes. Unfortunately, there are no plans to use them in any consumer products yet. Google rep Carlin Verri told 9to5Google that the companies started this project to push the industry forward.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, displays
Microsoft To Replace Surface Pro 4 Tablets Affected By Screen Flickering

Microsoft To Replace Surface Pro 4 Tablets Affected By Screen Flickering

Microsoft is unable to find a software or firmware fix for Surface Pro 4 tablets affected by screen flickering, so it’s launching a replacement program for them. Any Surface Pro 4 units experiencing the problem will be covered for up to three years from the time of original purchase. The Verge reports: The annoying flickering has been well-documented on Microsoft’s support forums, with some users taking drastic steps like putting their Surface Pro 4 in a freezer to temporarily fix the issue. Back in February, Microsoft said it was closely monitoring the situation, and the company came to the conclusion that there’s no convenient fix. Some customers have already paid for a screen replacement to stop the flickering since the problem typically arises when a machine is out of warranty; Microsoft says they’ll be “offered a refund.” The company notes that this three-year coverage doesn’t extend to other problems your Surface Pro might experience outside the warranty period; it only applies to the screen issue. Replacement devices are refurbished — not brand new — Surface Pro 4s.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, displays

Viotek GN27D 27-inch Curved 1440p 144Hz Monitor Review

Not that long ago we took a look at Viotek’s 32-inch GN32Q, which was their 1440p curved 144Hz display with a really cool rose gold design. While 32-inches is a good size, it seems most serious gamers feel a 27-inch or 24-inch display is really the sweet spot as you really don’t have to move your head around at all the view the entire screen. Viotek’s GN27D features a 27-inch curved VA panel with a 1440p (2560 x 1440) resolution, a 144 Hz refresh rate, and FreeSync. Compared to the GB32Q the GN27D definitely looks more like a gaming display with its all black design and slim stand. Even better is that this display is only $369.99 on Amazon, making it one of the most affordable 27-inch 1440p 144Hz curved display out there. Is this display worth picking up? Read on as we find out!

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Posted by amiller in 1400p, 144 Hz, 27-inch, Blog, Display, displays, Gaming Monitor, GN27D, Monitor, Review, Reviews, Viotek
Are Widescreen Laptops Dumb?

Are Widescreen Laptops Dumb?

“After years of phones, laptops, tablets, and TV screens converging on 16:9 as the ‘right’ display shape — allowing video playback without distracting black bars — smartphones have disturbed the universality recently by moving to even more elongated formats like 18:9, 19:9, or even 19.5:9 in the iPhone X’s case,” writes Amelia Holowaty Krales via The Verge. “That’s prompted me to consider where else the default widescreen proportions might be a poor fit, and I’ve realized that laptops are the worst offenders.” Krales makes the case for why a 16:9 screen of 13 to 15 inches in size is a poor fit: Practically every interface in Apple’s macOS, Microsoft’s Windows, and on the web is designed by stacking user controls in a vertical hierarchy. At the top of every MacBook, there’s a menu bar. At the bottom, by default, is the Dock for launching your most-used apps. On Windows, you have the taskbar serving a similar purpose — and though it may be moved around the screen like Apple’s Dock, it’s most commonly kept as a sliver traversing the bottom of the display. Every window in these operating systems has chrome — the extra buttons and indicator bars that allow you to close, reshape, or move a window around — and the components of that chrome are usually attached at the top and bottom. Look at your favorite website (hopefully this one) on the internet, and you’ll again see a vertical structure.

As if all that wasn’t enough, there’s also the matter of tabs. Tabs are a couple of decades old now, and, like much of the rest of the desktop and web environment, they were initially thought up in an age where the predominant computer displays were close to square with a 4:3 aspect ratio. That’s to say, most computer screens were the shape of an iPad when many of today’s most common interface and design elements were being developed. As much of a chrome minimalist as I try to be, I still can’t extricate myself from needing a menu bar in my OS and tab and address bars inside my browser. I’m still learning to live without a bookmarks bar. With all of these horizontal bars invading our vertical space, a 16:9 screen quickly starts to feel cramped, especially at the typical laptop size. You wind up spending more time scrolling through content than engaging with it. What is your preferred aspect ratio for a laptop? Do you prefer Microsoft and Google’s machines that have a squarer 3:2 aspect ratio, or Apple’s MacBook Pro that has a 16:10 display?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, displays
Latest macOS Update Disables DisplayLink, Rendering Thousands of Monitors Dead

Latest macOS Update Disables DisplayLink, Rendering Thousands of Monitors Dead

rh2600 writes: Four days ago, Apple’s latest macOS 10.13.4 update broke DisplayLink protocol support (perhaps permanently), turning what may be hundreds of thousands of external monitors connected to MacBook Pros via DisplayLink into paperweights. Some days in, DisplayLink has yet to announce any solution, and most worryingly there are indications that this is a permanent change to macOS moving forward. Mac Rumors is reporting that “users of the popular Mac desktop extension app Duet Display are being advised not to update to macOS 10.13.4, due to ‘critical bugs’ that prevent the software from communicating with connected iOS devices used as extra displays.” Users of other desktop extensions apps like Air Display and iDisplay are also reporting incompatibility with the latest version of macOS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, displays

Viotek GN32Q 32-inch Curved 1440p 144Hz Monitor Review

Viotek is a company you might not have heard of. While they offer a variety of different products, they are really making waves with their gaming monitors. Offering some great specs and features for a lower cost than some of the well-known brands out there. Today we have their GN32Q which is a 32-inch curved VA panel with a 1440p (2560 x 1440) resolution, 144 Hz refresh rate, Freesync compatibility, and a very modern design. At only $429.99 this display could be a steal, let’s see if that is the case…

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Posted by amiller in 144 Hz, 1440p, Blog, Curved, Display, displays, Gaming Monitor, GN32Q, Monitor, Review, Reviews, Viotek