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'Rime' Developer Keeps Promise, Removes Denuvo DRM After Game Gets Cracked

'Rime' Developer Keeps Promise, Removes Denuvo DRM After Game Gets Cracked

An anonymous reader quotes CinemaBlend:

Tequila Works and Grey Box had previously announced that the DRM for the PC version of Rime would be removed if it were cracked. Well, in just five days the DRM was cracked and a cracked version of the game was made available online. So, now the DRM will be removed…

Five days after the PC launch of Rime, the cracking scene managed to get into the executable and spill all of its guts, removing the DRM and putting the exe back together so it could be distributed across the usual sites. One of the things noted by the cracker was that he found Denuvo executing hundreds of triggers a second, which caused major slowdown in the performance of Rime on PC. This form of digital rights management resulted in every legitimate customer having to deal with a lot of slowdown and performance hiccups… The sad reality was that those who pirated Rime and used the cracked file essentially gained access to a game that had improved performance and frame-rates over those who actually paid for the game.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, drm
FSF Supports Today's Boston March Against DRM In HTML5

FSF Supports Today's Boston March Against DRM In HTML5

Atticus Rex writes:
A small artist-led group called Ethics in Tech is joining the long-simmering struggle between streaming video giants and Internet freedom activists over whether the Web should include Digital Rights Management in its technical standards. This Saturday, Ethics in Tech will lead a march on the W3C, the body — led by Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee — that decides on Web standards.

The Free Software Foundation is promoting the march, and their “Defective By Design” site is sharing this quote from the march’s organizers. Dear W3C: we demand you comply with UNESCO and international civil and political rights. Halt EME — ensure the protection of a secure, accessible, and open web. Make ethical standards or stand on the wrong side of history.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, drm
DRM Will Be Gone By 2025, Predicts Cory Doctorow

DRM Will Be Gone By 2025, Predicts Cory Doctorow

An anonymous reader writes:
It’s been two years since Cory Doctorow joined the EFF’s campaign to eliminate DRM within 8 years — and he still believes it’ll happen. “Farmers and the Digital Right To Repair Coalition have done brilliantly and have a message which is extremely resonant with the political right as well as the political left.” And now even the entertainment industry seems to oppose extending the DMCA to tractors. “The entertainment industry feels very proprietary towards laws that protect DRM. They really feel that they lobbied for and bought these laws in order to protect the business model they envisioned. For these latecomer upstarts to turn up and stretch and distort these laws out of proportion has really exposed one of the natural cracks in copyright altogether.”

Doctorow also says that “If there’s anything good that might come of Brexit, it’s that the UK will renegotiate and reevaluate its relationship to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and other directives. The UK enjoys a really interesting market position if it wants to be the only nation in the region that makes, exports, and supports DRM-breaking tools.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, drm
An Open Letter on DRM To the Inventor of the Web, From the Inventor of Net Neutrality

An Open Letter on DRM To the Inventor of the Web, From the Inventor of Net Neutrality

Tim Wu, a law professor at the Colombia University, and best known for coining the term “net neutrality,” has published an open letter to Tim Berners-Lee, the creator of the web and director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). In the letter, Wu has asked Berners-Lee to “seriously consider extending a protective covenant to legitimate circumventers who have cause to bypass EME, should it emerge as a W3C standard.” Cory Doctorow, writes for BoingBoing: But Wu goes on to draw a connection between the problems of DRM and the problems of network discrimination: DRM is wrapped up in a layer of legal entanglements (notably section 1201 of America’s Digital Millennium Copyright Act), which allow similar kinds of anticompetitive and ugly practices that make net neutrality so important. This is a live issue, too, because the W3C just held the most contentious vote in its decades-long history, on whether to publish a DRM standard for the web without any of the proposed legal protections for companies that create the kinds of competing products and services that the law permits, except when DRM is involved. As Wu points out, this sets up a situation where the incumbents get to create monopolies that produce the same problems for the open web that network neutrality advocates — like Berners-Lee — worry about.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, drm
The Kodi Development Team Wants To Be Legitimate and Bring DRM To the Platform.

The Kodi Development Team Wants To Be Legitimate and Bring DRM To the Platform.

New submitter pecosdave writes: The XBMC/ Kodi development team has taken a lot of heat over the years, mostly due to third-party developers introducing piracy plugins to the platform. In many cases, cheap Android computers are often sold with these plugins pre-installed with the Kodi or XBMC name attached to them — something that caused Amazon to ban sales of such devices. The Kodi team is not happy about this, and has taken the fight to the sellers. The Kodi team is now trying to work with rights holders to introduce DRM and legitimate plugins to the platform. Is this the first step towards creating a true one-stop do it yourself Linux entertainment system?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, drm
American Farmers Are Still Fighting Tractor Software Locks

American Farmers Are Still Fighting Tractor Software Locks

Manufacturers lock consumers into restrictive “user agreements,” and inside “there’s things like you won’t open the case, you won’t repair,” complains a U.S. advocacy group called The Repair Association. But now the issue is getting some more attention in the American press. An anonymous reader quotes NPR:
Modern tractors, essentially, have two keys to make the engine work. One key starts the engine. But because today’s tractors are high-tech machines that can steer themselves by GPS, you also need a software key — to fix the programs that make a tractor run properly. And farmers don’t get that key. “You’re paying for the metal but the electronic parts technically you don’t own it. They do,” says Kyle Schwarting, who plants and harvests fields in southeast Nebraska… “Maybe a gasket or something you can fix, but everything else is computer controlled and so if it breaks down I’m really in a bad spot,” Schwarting says.
He has to call the dealer. Only dealerships have the software to make those parts work, and it costs hundreds of dollars just to get a service call. Schwarting worries about being broken down in a field, waiting for a dealer to show up with a software key.

The article points out that equipment dealers are using those expensive repair calls to offset slumping tractor sales. But it also reports that eight U.S. states, including Nebraska, Illinois and New York, are still considering bills requiring manufacturers to sell repair software, adding that after Massachusetts passed a similar lar, “car makers started selling repair software.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, drm