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Intel Fires Warning Shot At Qualcomm and Microsoft Over Windows 10 ARM Emulation

Intel Fires Warning Shot At Qualcomm and Microsoft Over Windows 10 ARM Emulation

MojoKid quotes a report from HotHardware: Qualcomm and Microsoft are on the verge of ushering in a new class of always-connected mobile devices that run full-blown Windows 10. The two are enabling ARM-based Snapdragon 835 processors to run Windows 10 with full x86 emulation, meaning that devices will be capable of not only running Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps from the Windows Store, but legacy win32 apps as well. There is little question, Intel is likely none too pleased with it and PC OEM heavyweights Lenovo, Hewlett-Packard and ASUS have also signed-on to deliver Windows 10 notebooks and 2-in-1 convertibles powered by Qualcomm. Until now, Intel sat by quietly while all of this unfolded, but the company today took the opportunity to get a bit passive-aggressive while announcing the fast-approaching 40th anniversary of the world’s first x86 microprocessor. The majority of the press release reads like a trip down memory lane. However, Intel shifts into serious mama bear mode, with significant legal posturing, touting its willingness to protect its “x86 innovations.” Intel goes on to say that Transmeta tried and ultimately failed in the marketplace, and has been dead and buried for a decade. The company then pivots, almost daring Microsoft and Qualcomm to challenge it by making Windows on ARM devices commercially available. “Only time will tell if new attempts to emulate Intel’s x86 ISA will meet a different fate. Intel welcomes lawful competition… However, we do not welcome unlawful infringement of our patents, and we fully expect other companies to continue to respect Intel’s intellectual property rights.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, emulation
How The 1997 'NESticle' Emulator Redefined Retro Gaming

How The 1997 'NESticle' Emulator Redefined Retro Gaming

Slashdot reader martiniturbide writes: For those who lived the console emulator and retrogaming boom on the late 90’s there is this interesting article about the story of NESticle posted at Motherboard. NESticle was a Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) console emulator that had a huge success in the early internet era and helped to start the emulation scene. The author of the story, Ernie Smith, also posted an extra second part of the story…
NESticle was “the product of a talented programmer who designed a hit shareware game while he was still in high school,” according to the article, which credits the 1997 emulator with popularizing now-standard emulator features like movie recording and save states, as well as user modifications. Programmed in assembly code and C++ and targeting 468 processors, NESticle was followed by emulators for the Sega Genesis and the Capcom arcade platform before Icer Addis moved on to a professional career in the gaming industry, working for Electronic Arts and Zynga. Leave a comment if you’re a fan of classic game emulators — or if you just want to share your own fond memories of that late-’90s emulation scene.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, emulation
Ask Slashdot: Can Linux Run a GPU-Computing Application Written For Windows?

Ask Slashdot: Can Linux Run a GPU-Computing Application Written For Windows?

dryriver writes:
I have been told that Linux can run Windows software using Wine or perhaps a VM. What happens if that Windows software is a GPU-computing application — accessing the GPU through HLSL/GLSL/CUDA/OpenCL or similar interfaces?

Can Wine or other solutions run that software at a decent speed under Linux? Or is GPU-computing software written for the Windows platform unsuitable for use — emulated or otherwise — under Linux?
This sounds like one of those cases where there’s a theoretical answer and then your own real-world experiences. So leave your best answers in the comments. Can Linux run a GPU-computing application that’s written for Windows?

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Posted by amiller in Blog, emulation