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European Parliament Committee Endorses End-To-End Encryption

European Parliament Committee Endorses End-To-End Encryption

The civil liberties committee of the European Parliament has released a draft proposal “in direct contrast to the increasingly loud voices around the world to introduce regulations or weaken encryption,” according to an anonymous Slashdot reader. Tom’s Hardware reports:

The draft recommends a regulation that will enforce end-to-end encryption on all communications to protect European Union citizens’ fundamental privacy rights. The committee also recommended a ban on backdoors. Article 7 of the E.U.’s Charter of Fundamental Rights says that E.U. citizens have a right to personal privacy, as well as privacy in their family life and at home. According to the EP committee, the privacy of communications between individuals is also an important dimension of this right…

We’ve lately seen some EU member states push for increased surveillance and even backdoors in encrypted communications, so there seems to be some conflict here between what the European Parliament institutional bodies may want and what some member states do. However, if this proposal for the new Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communications passes, it should significantly increase the privacy of E.U. citizens’ communications, and it won’t be so easy to roll back the changes to add backdoors in the future.
Security researcher Lukasz Olejnik says “the fact that policy is seriously considering these kind of aspects is unprecedented.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
Pirate Bay Is Infringing Copyright, European Court of Justice Rules

Pirate Bay Is Infringing Copyright, European Court of Justice Rules

The European court of justice (ECJ) has ruled that BitTorrent site The Pirate Bay is directly infringing copyright, in a move that could lead to ISPs and governments blocking access to other torrent sites across Europe. From a report: The ruling comes after a seven-year legal battle, which has seen the site, founded in Sweden in 2003, blocked and seized, its offices raided, and its three founders fined and jailed. At the heart of the case is the Pirate Bay’s argument that, unlike the previous generation piracy sites like Napster, it doesn’t host infringing files, nor link to them. Instead, it hosts “trackers,” files which tell users of individual BitTorrent apps which other BitTorrent users to link to in order to download large files — in the Pirate Bay’s case, usually, but not exclusively, copyrighted material.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
EU Mobile Roaming Charges Scrapped

EU Mobile Roaming Charges Scrapped

From now on, European Union holidaymakers should return home without that sense of high anxiety about their mobile phone bill: extra fees for using it abroad should have gone. From a report: The new rules mean that citizens travelling within the EU will be able to call, text and browse the internet on mobile devices at the same price they pay at home. The European Commission said the end of roaming charges was one of the greatest successes of the EU. But a UK consumer group warned phone users could face “unexpected charges.” Until now roaming, or connection, charges have been added to the cost of calls, texts and internet browsing when consumers from one EU country travelled to another and connected to a mobile network there.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
Museum of Failure Opens In Sweden

Museum of Failure Opens In Sweden

Slashdot reader swellconvivialguy writes: A new museum in Helsingborg displays more than 70 failed products and objects, including the Apple Newton, Google Glass, Sony Betamax, Harley-Davidson perfume, and the Donald Trump board game. According to curator Samuel West, “none of the companies that I contacted wanted to cooperate. I approached quite a few innovation directors and asked them for examples of failure that they’ve learned from. I thought it would be easy to get them to collaborate but none of them — zero — choose to cooperate.”
The curator urges people to accept failure — “as an essential aspect of progress and innovation.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
EU Seeks New Powers To Obtain Data 'Directly' From Tech Firms

EU Seeks New Powers To Obtain Data 'Directly' From Tech Firms

Zack Whittaker reports via ZDNet: European authorities are seeking new powers to allow police and intelligence agencies to directly obtain user data stored on the continent by U.S. tech companies. The move comes in the wake of an uptick in terrorist attacks, including several attacks in Britain and France, among others across the bloc. Tech companies have been asked to do more to help law enforcement, while police have long argued the process for gathering data overseas is slow and cumbersome. The bloc’s justice commissioner, Vera Jourova, presented several plans to a meeting of justice ministers in Luxembourg on Thursday to speed up access for EU police forces to obtain evidence — including one proposal to allow police to obtain data “directly” from the cloud servers of U.S. tech companies in urgent cases. “Commissioner Jourova presented at the Justice Council three legislative options to improve access to e-evidence,” said Christian Wiga, an EU spokesperson, in an email. “Based on the discussion between justice ministers, the Commission will now prepare a legislative proposal,” he added. Discussions are thought to have included what kind of data could be made available, ranging from geolocation data to the contents of private messages. Such powers would only be used in “emergency” situations, said Jourova, adding that safeguards would require police to ensure that each request is “necessary” and “proportionate.” Further reading: Reuters

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
Twitter Isn't Removing Enough Hate Speech, Complains The EU

Twitter Isn't Removing Enough Hate Speech, Complains The EU

An anonymous reader quotes CNN:
Twitter is not good enough at removing hate speech from its platform. That’s the judgment of Europe’s top regulator, which released data on Thursday showing that Twitter has failed to meet its standard of taking down 50% of hate speech posts after being warned that they include objectionable content. Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, and Google have all agreed to do more, promising last May to review a majority of hate speech flagged by users within 24 hours and to remove any illegal content.
A year into the agreement, the European Commission said that Facebook and YouTube, which is owned by Google, have both managed to remove 66% of reported hate speech. Twitter’s rate, meanwhile, was 38%. That’s below the commission’s standard but a major improvement from December, when the service was removing only 19% of hate speech… Twitter was also slightly slower than rivals Facebook and YouTube when it came to reviewing content. The regulator said that Facebook reviewed flagged content within 24 hours in 58% of cases. YouTube did the same 43% of the time, while Twitter met the 24-hour benchmark in 39% of cases.

European lawmakers are considering laws mandating the blocking of online hate speech, so they’re carefully watching what happens when social media companies self-regulate.

“Tackling illegal hate speech online is a contribution to the fight against terrorism,” argued the EU Commission’s top justice official.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
Google Could Face a $9 Billion EU Fine For Rigging Search Results In Its Favor

Google Could Face a $9 Billion EU Fine For Rigging Search Results In Its Favor

schwit1 quotes a report from The Independent: EU antitrust regulators aim to slap a hefty fine on Alphabet unit Google over its shopping service before the summer break in August, two people familiar with the matter said, setting the stage for two other cases involving the U.S. company. The European Commission’s decision will come after a seven-year investigation into the world’s most popular internet search engine was triggered by scores of complaints from both U.S. and European rivals. Fines for companies found guilty of breaching EU antitrust rules can reach 10 percent of their global turnover, which in Google’s case could be about $9 billion of its 2016 turnover. Apart from the fine, the Commission will tell Google to stop its alleged anti-competitive practices but it is not clear what measures it will order the company to adopt to ensure that rivals get equal treatment in internet shopping results. The company has also been charged with using its Android mobile operating system to squeeze out rivals and with blocking competitors in online search advertising related to its “AdSense for Search” platform. The platform allows Google to act as an intermediary for websites such as online retailers, telecoms operators or newspapers. The Commission has warned of massive fines in both cases.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
European Union Will Fund Public Wifi

European Union Will Fund Public Wifi

An anonymous reader writes: The European Union is moving towards getting free public wifi into unconnected locations around the bloc. A new agreement will provide 120 million euros to “fund equipment for public free Wi-Fi services in 6,000 to 8,000 municipalities” across the E.U.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
EU Passes 'Content Portability' Rules Banning Geofencing

EU Passes 'Content Portability' Rules Banning Geofencing

Long-time Slashdot reader AmiMoJo writes: The European Parliament has passed draft rules mandating ‘content portability’, i.e. the ability to take your purchased content and services across borders within the EU. Freedom of movement rules, which allow EU citizens to live and work anywhere in the EU, require that the individual is able to take their life with them — family, property, and services. Under the new rules, someone who pays for Netflix or BBC iPlayer and then moves to another EU country will retain access to those services and the same content they had previously. Separately, rules to prevent geofencing of content within the EU entirely are also moving forward.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu
US and EU Reject Expanding Laptop Ban To Flights From Europe

US and EU Reject Expanding Laptop Ban To Flights From Europe

An anonymous reader writes: US and EU officials have decided against a ban on laptops and tablets in cabin baggage on flights from Europe. But after a four-hour meeting in Brussels to discuss the threats to aviation security, officials said other measures were still being considered. US officials had previously said they were looking into extending to Europe a ban on electronics on flights from eight mostly Muslim countries. The measure was introduced over fears a bomb could be concealed in a device. The meeting was requested by EU officials after recent reports suggested US authorities had new information regarding laptop parts being turned into explosives.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, eu