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Why Decentralization Matters

Why Decentralization Matters

Chris Dixon has an essay about the long-term promise of blockchain-based networks to upend web-based businesses such as Facebook and Twitter. He writes: When they hit the top of the S-curve, their relationships with network participants change from positive-sum to zero-sum. The easiest way to continue growing lies in extracting data from users and competing with complements over audiences and profits. Historical examples of this are Microsoft vs Netscape, Google vs Yelp, Facebook vs Zynga, and Twitter vs its 3rd-party clients. Operating systems like iOS and Android have behaved better, although still take a healthy 30% tax, reject apps for seemingly arbitrary reasons, and subsume the functionality of 3rd-party apps at will.
For 3rd parties, this transition from cooperation to competition feels like a bait-and-switch. Over time, the best entrepreneurs, developers, and investors have become wary of building on top of centralized platforms. We now have decades of evidence that doing so will end in disappointment. In addition, users give up privacy, control of their data, and become vulnerable to security breaches. These problems with centralized platforms will likely become even more pronounced in the future.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
Facebook Plans To Use US Mail To Verify IDs of Election Ad Buyers

Facebook Plans To Use US Mail To Verify IDs of Election Ad Buyers

Facebook will start using postcards sent by U.S. mail later this year to verify the identities and location of people who want to purchase U.S. election-related advertising on its site, a senior company executive said on Saturday. From a report: The postcard verification is Facebook’s latest effort to respond to criticism from lawmakers, security experts and election integrity watchdog groups that it and other social media companies failed to detect and later responded slowly to Russia’s use of their platforms to spread divisive political content, including disinformation, during the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
Facebook Is Spamming Users Via Their 2FA Phone Numbers

Facebook Is Spamming Users Via Their 2FA Phone Numbers

According to Mashable, Facebook account holder Gabriel Lewis tweeted that Facebook texted “spam” to the phone number he submitted for the purposes of 2-factor authentication. Lewis insists that he did not have mobile notifications turned on, and when he replied “stop” and “DO NOT TEXT ME,” he says those messages showed up on his Facebook wall. From the report: Lewis explained his version of the story to Mashable via Twitter direct message. “[Recently] I decided to sign up for 2FA on all of my accounts including FaceBook, shortly afterwards they started sending me notifications from the same phone number. I never signed up for it and I don’t even have the FB app on my phone.” Lewis further explained that he can go “for months” without signing into Facebook, which suggests the possibility that Mark Zuckerberg’s creation was feeling a little neglected and trying to get him back. According to Lewis, he signed up for 2FA on Dec. 17 and the alleged spamming began on Jan. 5. Importantly, Lewis isn’t the only person who claims this happened to him. One Facebook user says he accidentally told “friends and family to go [to] hell” when he “replied to the spam.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
Even Apple and Google Engineers Can't Really Afford To Live Near Their Offices

Even Apple and Google Engineers Can't Really Afford To Live Near Their Offices

That’s according to the Y Combinator-backed real-estate startup Open Listings, which looked at median home sales prices near the headquarters (meaning within a 20-minute commute) of some of the Bay Area’s biggest and best-known tech companies. Fast Company: Using public salary data from Paysa, Open Listings then looked at how many software engineers from those companies could actually afford to buy a house close to their office. Here’s what it found: Engineers at five major SF-based tech companies would need to spend over the 28% threshold of their income to afford a monthly mortgage near their offices. Apple engineers would have to pay an average of 33% of their monthly income for a mortgage near work. That’s the highest percentage of the companies analyzed, and home prices in Cupertino continue to skyrocket. Google wasn’t much better at 32%, and living near the Facebook office would cost an engineer 29% of their monthly paycheck.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
Messenger Kids Advocates Were Facebook-Funded

Messenger Kids Advocates Were Facebook-Funded

Fast Company: Facebook unveiled this kid-friendly version of its signature messaging service in December, while the YouTube Kids scandal was in full swing. Messenger Kids, Facebook said, had been designed to serve as a “fun, safer solution” for family communications. It would be available for children as young as 6, the company said. To forestall criticism, Facebook asserted that the app had been developed alongside thousands of parents and a dozen expert advisors. But it looks like many of those outside experts were funded with Facebook dollars. According to Wired, “At least seven members of Facebook 13-person advisory board have some kind of financial tie to the company.” Those advisors include the National PTA, Blue Star Families, Connect Safely, and the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
Facebook is Pushing Its Data-tracking Onavo VPN Within Its Main Mobile App

Facebook is Pushing Its Data-tracking Onavo VPN Within Its Main Mobile App

TechCrunch reports: Onavo Protect, the VPN client from the data-security app maker acquired by Facebook back in 2013, has now popped up in the Facebook app itself, under the banner “Protect” in the navigation menu. Clicking through on “Protect” will redirect Facebook users to the “Onavo Protect — VPN Security” app’s listing on the App Store. We’re currently seeing this option on iOS only, which may indicate it’s more of a test than a full rollout here in the U.S. Marketing Onavo within Facebook itself could lead to a boost in users for the VPN app, which promises to warn users of malicious websites and keep information secure as you browse. But Facebook didn’t buy Onavo for its security protections. Instead, Onavo’s VPN allow Facebook to monitor user activity across apps, giving Facebook a big advantage in terms of spotting new trends across the larger mobile ecosystem. For example, Facebook gets an early heads up about apps that are becoming breakout hits; it can tell which are seeing slowing user growth; it sees which apps’ new features appear to be resonating with their users, and much more. Further reading: Do Not, I Repeat, Do Not Download Onavo, Facebook’s Vampiric VPN Service (Gizmodo).

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
YouTube CEO: Facebook Should 'Get Back To Baby Pictures'

YouTube CEO: Facebook Should 'Get Back To Baby Pictures'

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki won’t divulge her biggest fear about competing with Facebook, but she will give them some free advice. From a report: “They should get back to baby pictures,” Wojcicki said Monday at the Code Media conference in Huntington Beach, California. Video has been an obsession for Facebook, as it tries to swipe the most advertising dollars migrating off television before YouTube can get them. Facebook has been aggressively advancing the number of clips and live streams that bubble up to the top of your News Feed and has rolled out a central hub for TV-like programming called Watch. “You always have to take competition seriously. You don’t win by looking backwards; you win by looking at your customers and looking forward,” she said.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
Facebook Lost Around 2.8 Million US Users Under 25 Last Year

Facebook Lost Around 2.8 Million US Users Under 25 Last Year

According to new estimates by eMarketer, Facebook users in the 12- to 17-year-old demographic declined by 9.9 percent in 2017, or about 1.4 million total users. That’s almost three times more than the digital measurement firm expected. There were roughly 12.1 million U.S. Facebook users in the 12- to 17-year-old demographic by the end of the year. Recode reports: There are likely multiple reasons for the decline. Facebook has been losing its “cool” factor for years, and young people have more options than ever for staying in touch with friends and family. Facebook also serves as a digital record keeper — but many young people don’t seem to care about saving their life online, at least not publicly. That explains why Snapchat and Instagram, which offer features for sharing photos and videos that disappear, are growing in popularity among this demographic. Overall, eMarketer found Facebook lost about 2.8 million U.S. users under 25 last year. The research firm released Facebook usage estimates for 2018 on Monday, and expects that Facebook will lose about 2.1 million users in the U.S. under the age of 25 this year.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
A Facebook Employee Asked a Reporter To Turn Off His Phone So Facebook Couldn't Track Its Location

A Facebook Employee Asked a Reporter To Turn Off His Phone So Facebook Couldn't Track Its Location

Steve Kovach, writing for BusinessInsider: To corporate giants like Facebook, leaks to rivals or the media are a cardinal sin. That notion was clear in a new Wired story about Facebook’s rocky time over the last two years. The story talks about how Facebook was able to find two leakers who told a Gizmodo reporter about its news operations. But one source for the Wired story highlighted just how concerned employees are about how their company goes after leakers. According to the story, the source, a current Facebook employee, asked a Wired reporter to turn off his phone so Facebook wouldn’t be able to use location tracking and see that the two were close to each other for the meeting. The Wired’s 11,000-word wide-ranging piece, for which it spoke with more than 50 current and former Facebook employees, gives us an inside look at how the company has been struggling to curb spread of fake news; battling internal discrimination among employees; and becoming furious when anything leaks to the media. Another excerpt from the story: The day after Fearnow (a contractor who leaked information to a Gizmodo reporter) took that second screenshot was a Friday. When he woke up after sleeping in, he noticed that he had about 30 meeting notifications from Facebook on his phone. When he replied to say it was his day off, he recalls, he was nonetheless asked to be available in 10 minutes. Soon he was on a video-conference with three Facebook employees, including Sonya Ahuja, the company’s head of investigations. According to his recounting of the meeting, she asked him if he had been in touch with Nunez (the Gizmodo reporter, who eventually published this and this). He denied that he had been. Then she told him that she had their messages on Gchat, which Fearnow had assumed weren’t accessible to Facebook. He was fired. “Please shut your laptop and don’t reopen it,” she instructed him.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook
Facebook 'Likes' Are a Powerful Tool For Authoritarian Rulers, Court Petition Says

Facebook 'Likes' Are a Powerful Tool For Authoritarian Rulers, Court Petition Says

A Cambodian opposition leader has filed a petition in a California court against Facebook, demanding the company disclose its transactions with his country’s authoritarian prime minister, whom he accuses of falsely inflating his popularity through purchased “likes” and spreading fake news. From a report: The petition, filed Feb. 8, brings the ongoing debate over Facebook’s power to undermine democracies into a legal setting. The petitioner, Sam Rainsy, says that Hun Sen, the prime minister, “has used the network to threaten violence against political opponents and dissidents, disseminate false information, and manipulate his (and the regime’s) supposed popularity, thus seeking to foster an illusion of popular legitimacy.” Rainsy alleges that Hun had used “click farms” to artificially boost his popularity, effectively buying “likes.” The petition says that Hun had achieved astonishing Facebook fame in a very short time, raising questions about whether this popularity was legitimate.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, facebook