firefox

Auto Added by WPeMatico

Firefox's Pocket Tries to Build a Facebook-Style Newsfeed That Respects Your Privacy

Firefox's Pocket Tries to Build a Facebook-Style Newsfeed That Respects Your Privacy

An anonymous reader quotes Ars Technica:
Pocket, which lets you save articles and videos you find around the web to consume later, now has a home inside Firefox as the engine powering recommendations to 50 million people a month. By analyzing the articles and videos people save into Pocket, [Pocket founder and CEO Nate] Weiner believes the company can show people the best of the web — in a personalized way — without building an all-knowing, Facebook-style profile of the user.

“We’re testing this really cool personalization system within Firefox where it uses your browser history to target personalized [recommendations], but none of that data actually comes back to Pocket or Mozilla,” Weiner said. “It all happens on the client, inside the browser itself. There is this notion today… I feel like you saw it in the Zuckerberg hearings. It was like, ‘Oh, users. They will give us their data in return for a better experience.’ That’s the premise, right? And yes, you could do that. But we don’t feel like that is the required premise. There are ways to build these things where you don’t have to trade your life profile in order to actually get a good experience.”
Pocket can analyze which articles and videos from around the web are being shared as well as which ones are being read and watched. Over time, that gives the company a good understanding of which links lead to high-quality content that users of either Pocket or Firefox might enjoy.
I use Firefox, but I don’t use Pocket.
Are there any Slashdot readers who want to share their experiences with read-it-later services, or thoughts about what Firefox is attempting?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox
'Why I'm Switching From Chrome To Firefox and You Should Too'

'Why I'm Switching From Chrome To Firefox and You Should Too'

An anonymous reader quotes an associate technology editor at Fast Company’s Co.Design:
While the amount of data about me may not have caused harm in my life yet — as far as I know — I don’t want to be the victim of monopolistic internet oligarchs as they continue to cash in on surveillance-based business models. What’s a concerned citizen of the internet to do? Here’s one no-brainer: Stop using Chrome and switch to Firefox… [W]hy should I continue to use the company’s browser, which acts as literally the window through which I experience much of the internet, when its incentives — to learn a lot about me so it can sell advertisements — don’t align with mine….?
Unlike Chrome, Firefox is run by Mozilla, a nonprofit organization that advocates for a “healthy” internet. Its mission is to help build an internet in an open-source manner that’s accessible to everyone — and where privacy and security are built in. Contrast that to Chrome’s privacy policy, which states that it stores your browsing data locally unless you are signed in to your Google account, which enables the browser to send that information back to Google. The policy also states that Chrome allows third-party websites to access your IP address and any information that site has tracked using cookies. If you care about privacy at all, you should ditch the browser that supports a company using data to sell advertisements and enabling other companies to track your online movements for one that does not use your data at all…. Firefox protects you from being tracked by advertising networks across websites, which has the lovely side effect of making sites load faster…
Ultimately, Firefox’s designers have the leeway to make these privacy-first decisions because Mozilla’s motivations are fundamentally different from Google’s. Mozilla is a nonprofit with a mission, and Google is a for-profit corporation with an advertising-based business model.. While Firefox and Chrome ultimately perform the same service, the browsers’ developers approached their design in a radically different way because one organization has to serve a bottom line, and the other doesn’t.
The article points out that ironically, Mozilla supports its developers partly with revenue from Google, which (along with other search engines) pays to be listed as one of the search engines available in Firefox’s search bar.
“But because it relies on these agreements rather than gathering user data so it can sell advertisements, the Mozilla Corporation has a fundamentally different business model than Google.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox
Firefox Moves Browsers Into Post-Password Future With WebAuthn Tech

Firefox Moves Browsers Into Post-Password Future With WebAuthn Tech

Today, Mozilla released Firefox 60 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Android, and with it arrives Web Authentication API for desktop browsers. From a report: Firefox 60 supports technology called Web Authentication, or WebAuthn for short, that can be used to grant you access to websites with a physical authentication device like a YubiKey dongle, biometric identity proof using an Android phone’s fingerprint reader or the iPhone’s Face ID, and some other alternatives to passwords. Passwords are a particular problem on the web. Fake websites can coax you to type in credentials that then can be used to steal money from your bank account or snoop your email — a problem called phishing. Even if you pick hard-to-guess passwords, never reuse them on multiple sites and always remember them, passwords still aren’t that strong a foundation for security these days. We’re still a long way away from a post-password future, but WebAuthn is an important step, if nothing else, in making sites more secure.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox
Bookmark Syncing Service Xmarks Closes For Good On May 1

Bookmark Syncing Service Xmarks Closes For Good On May 1

Remember that popular browser extension that let you sync your bookmarks on multiple devices?
Launched in 2006 by Foxmarks (a company created by EFF co-founder Mitch Kapor), it was saved from death in 2010 when it was acquired by the password-management service LastPass. But now BetaNews reports:
If you’re a user of Xmarks, there’s some bad news for you — the service is closing down… The bookmark syncing tool, which is available as an addon for Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari, is to be shuttered on May 1… Emails have also been sent out to registered users notifying them of the impending closure.
“On May 1, 2018, we will be shutting down Xmarks… After this date, your bookmarks should remain available in any previously accessed browser, but they will no longer sync and your Xmarks account will be deactivated… After careful consideration and evaluation, we have decided to discontinue the Xmarks solution so that we can continue to focus on offering the best possible password vaulting to our community.”

It was apparently especially popular with long-time Slashdot reader vm, who writes “I have held on to my Xmarks account over the years because I can always get to them despite changes in operating systems, browsers, employers, etc.
“What do other folks use that may also have a mobile option?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox
Firefox 11.0 For iOS Arrives With Tracking Protection On By Default

Firefox 11.0 For iOS Arrives With Tracking Protection On By Default

The new version of Firefox 11.0 for iOS turns on tracking protection by default, lets you reorder your tabs, and adds a handful of iPad-specific features. The latest version is currently available via Apple’s App Store. VentureBeat details the new features: Tracking protection means Firefox blocks website elements (ads, analytics trackers, and social share buttons) that could track you while you’re surfing the web. It’s almost like a built-in ad blocker, though it’s really closer to browser add-ons like Ghostery and Privacy Badger because ads that don’t track you are allowed through. The feature’s blocking list, which is based on the tracking protection rules laid out by the anti-tracking startup Disconnect, is published under the General Public License and available on GitHub. The feature is great for privacy, but it also improves performance. Content loads faster for many websites, which translates into less data usage and better battery life. If tracking protection doesn’t work well on a given site, just turn it off there and Firefox for iOS should remember your preference.

Tracking protection aside, iOS users can now reorder their tabs. Organizing your tabs is very straightforward: Long-press the specific tab and drag it either left or right. iPad users have gained two new features, as well. You can now share URLs by just dragging and dropping links to and from Firefox with any other iOS app. If you’re in side-by-side view, just drag the link or tab into the other app. Otherwise, bring up the doc or app switcher, drag the link into the other app until it pulses, release the link, and the other app will open the link. Lastly, iPad users have gained a few more keyboard shorts, including the standard navigation keys from the desktop. There’s also cursor navigation through the bookmarks and history results, an escape key in the URL bar, and easier tab tray navigation (try using the keyboard shortcut Command + Option + Tab to get to and from the tabs view).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox
Firefox In 2018: We'll Tackle Bad Ads, Breach Alerts, Autoplay Video, Says Mozilla

Firefox In 2018: We'll Tackle Bad Ads, Breach Alerts, Autoplay Video, Says Mozilla

An anonymous reader quotes a report from ZDNet: Firefox maker Mozilla has outlined its 2018 roadmap to make the web less intrusive and safer for users. First up, Mozilla says it will proceed and implement last year’s experiment with a breach alerts service, which will warn users when their credentials have been leaked or stolen in a data breach. Mozilla aims to roll out the service around October. Breach Alerts is based on security consultant Troy Hunt’s data breach site Have I Been Pwned. Firefox will also implement a similar block on autoplay video to the one Chrome 66 will introduce next month, and that Safari already has. However, Dotzler says Firefox’s implementation will “provide users with a way to block video auto-play that doesn’t break websites”. This feature is set to arrive in Firefox 62, which is scheduled for release in May.

After Firefox 62 the browser will gain an optional Chrome-like ad filter and several privacy-enhancing features similar to those that Apple’s WebKit developers have been working on for Safari’s Intelligent Tracking Prevention. By the third quarter of 2018, Firefox should also be blocking ad-retargeting through cross-domain tracking. It’s also going to move all key privacy controls into a single location in the browser, and offer more “fine-grained” tracking protection. Dotzler says Mozilla is in the “early stages” of determining what types of ads Firefox should block by default. Also on the roadmap is a feature that arrived in Firefox 59, released earlier this month. A new Global Permissions feature will help users avoid having to deny every site that requests permission for location, camera, microphone and notifications. Beyond security and privacy, Mozilla plans to build on speed-focused Quantum improvements that came in Firefox 57 with smoother page rendering.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox
Firefox Gets Privacy Boost By Disabling Proximity and Ambient Light Sensor APIs

Firefox Gets Privacy Boost By Disabling Proximity and Ambient Light Sensor APIs

Stating with Firefox 60 — expected to be released in May 2018 — websites won’t be able to use Firefox to access data from sensors that provide proximity distances and ambient light information. From a report: Firefox was allowing websites to access this data via the W3C Proximity and Ambient Light APIs. But at the start of the month, Mozilla engineers decided to disable access to these two APIs by default. The APIs won’t be removed, but their status is now controlled by two Firefox flags that will ship disabled by default. This means users will have to manually enable the two flags before any website can use Firefox to extract proximity and ambient light data from the device’s underlying sensors. The two flags will be available in Firefox’s about:config settings page. The screenshot below shows the latest Firefox Nightly version, where the two flags are now disabled, while other sensor APIs are enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox
Mozilla Removes Individual Cookie Management in Firefox 60

Mozilla Removes Individual Cookie Management in Firefox 60

Martin Brinkmann, writing for Ghacks: The most recent version of Firefox Nightly, currently at version 60, comes with changes to Firefox’s cookie management. Mozilla merged cookie settings with site data in the web browser which impacts how you configure and manage cookie options. If you run Firefox 59 or earlier, you can load about:preferences#privacy to manage privacy related settings in Firefox. If you set the history to “use custom settings for history” or “remember history”, you get an option manage cookie settings and to remove individual cookies from Firefox. A click on the link or button opens a new browser window in which all set cookies are listed. You can use it to find set cookies, look up information, remove selected or all cookies. Mozilla engineers changed this in recent versions of Firefox 60 (currently on the Nightly channel).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox
Firefox To Let Users Control Memory Usage

Firefox To Let Users Control Memory Usage

An anonymous reader quotes a report from BleepingComputer: Mozilla engineers are working on a new section in the browser’s preferences that will let users control the browser’s performance. Work on this new section started last Friday when an issue was opened in the Firefox bug tracker. Right now, the Firefox UI team has proposed a basic sketch of the settings section and its controls. Firefox developers are now working to isolate or implement the code needed to control those settings [1, 2, 3]. According to the current version of the planned Performance settings section UI, users will be able to control if they use UI animations (to be added in a future Firefox version), if they use page prefetching (feature to preload links listed on a page), and how many “content” processes Firefox uses (Firefox currently supports two processes [one for the Firefox core and one for content], but this will expand to more starting v54).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Go to Source

Posted by amiller in Blog, firefox