Facebook tool cuts through React complexity

Facebook attempts to make it easier to get started with its React Native framework, launching the CRNA (Create React Native App) tool for building mobile apps with no build configuration.Introduced Monday, CRNA was co-developed by Facebook and Expo, formerly Exponent. The tool, deemed stable for general use, was inspired by the design of Create React App for building React JavaScript apps sans build configuration.[ Get started: A developer’s guide to serverless computing. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]”Many developers struggle with installing and configuring React Native’s current native build dependencies, especially for Android,” said Adam Perry, Expo software engineer. “With Create React Native App, there’s no need to use Xcode or Android Studio and you can develop for your iOS device using Linux or Windows.” The tool works with the Expo open source mobile development tool, which builds atop React Native. Expo loads and runs CRNA projects written in JavaScript without compiling native code.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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Posted by amiller in Blog

Nginx JavaScript is ready for prime time

Nginx has upgraded its web server and load balancer to take advantage of its JavaScript implementation.
The company on Tuesday debuts Nginx Plus R12, the commercially supported version of its technology. This release moves NginScript, a JavaScript-based programming tool, to general availability for production use. Developers can choose NginScript for traffic handling, via a familiar JavaScript syntax. The code can be embedded in Nginx Plus for actions on HTTP, TCP, and UDP traffic.[ Use JavaScript in your dev shop? InfoWorld looks at 17 JavaScript editors and IDEs and 22 JavaScript frameworks ready for adoption. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ] “JavaScript programmers can actually do the same thing you can do in Lua,” which has been used for programming the Nginx server, said Chris Lippi, vice president of products for Nginx. JavaScript is more pervasive than Lua, so users get an expanded programming talent base to choose from for hiring purposes.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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6 security essentials the CIA forgot

Wikileaks’ CIA dump is the biggest secret cache released so far. It’s embarrassing to the CIA. It undermines our intelligence efforts. And it didn’t need to happen.
The sad fact is that the world’s computers are not configured securely enough to match the confidentiality of the data they are protecting. As a society we allow our computers to languish in a state that almost invites attackers to access them—even at the CIA, apparently.[ Watch out for 11 signs you’ve been hacked—and learn how to fight back, in InfoWorld’s PDF special report. | Discover how to secure your systems with InfoWorld’s Security Report newsletter. ] That may finally be changing, though remediation has been slow to roll out. In my view, the tipping point was the Sony hack, which was so embarrassing and costly that it scared execs in a way that the Target, Home Depot, and Office of Management and Budget hacks did not.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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LLVM coroutines come to C++, await Swift and Rust

LLVM, the open source compiler framework that’s used as part of the toolchain for languages like Rust and Swift, was bumped up to version 4.0 this week.
The most eye-catching addition is support for coroutines, a construction found in many modern programming languages that can be used as a less cumbersome (albeit slightly less powerful) alternative to threading.[ Get started with functional programming, including examples in F#. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ] Previously, a language with coroutines that compiled in LLVM would have had to implement coroutines by hand. LLVM 4.0 adds support for representing coroutines directly in the compiler via new instructions in its intermediate representation (IR).To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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The path to cloud success goes through your data

Last week, Google showcased its enterprise cloud offerings at the Google Cloud Next conference, trying to show it could meet the needs of businesses, not only schools and small companies. The underlying pattern I saw in Google’s presentations was data.Increasingly, I see the same focus on data among all cloud providers. It’s not Google alone that understands the need for data. Data should also be your IT organization’s measure of success in the cloud. I often look at the state of the data to determine success or failure of an enterprise that’s moving—or has moved—to the cloud.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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Well, SOMEBODY'S unclear on the concept here…

This manufacturing plant’s managers decide to go for a VPP safety rating from the federal government, reports an IT pilot fish on the scene.”Not many plants achieve it. Good news, right?” says fish.”Wrong. We were suddenly slogged down with ridiculous requirements that kept us from doing our jobs.”For example, for any cabinet that contained live electrical inside, I was required to wear a heavy blue flameproof lab coat, a flameproof hairnet — on my shaved head — and heavy leather gloves.”Ever try to terminate Cat 5 cable with heavy gloves?To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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How CIOs cope when mobile app development goes rogue

When Independence Blue Cross released its first mobile app in 2012, it simultaneously embraced the tech trend of the moment and perpetuated the legacy of shadow IT.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here(Insider Story)

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Posted by amiller in Blog