Microsoft brings Python coding help beyond Visual Studio

Microsoft plans to extend IntelliSense code analysis for Python to tools beyond Visual Studio, using its Python Language Server. IntelliSense provides autocompletions for variables, functions, and other symbols that appear as developers type code.

Available as a beta in the July release of the Python extension for Visual Studio, the Python Language Server will be offered later this year as a standalone component for use with tools that support the Language Server Protocol. That protocol lets editing tools and IDEs support multiple languages.

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Posted by amiller in Blog

Dell Latitude 7390

Dell’s 13.3-inch Latitude 7390 business laptop is compact and lightweight, with fine fit and finish, but its steep price magnifies its minor flaws.

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Motorola Moto E5 Plus

The Motorola Moto E5 Plus is a hefty Sprint phablet with a massive 5,000mAh battery that can keep it going for days, but it’s too expensive for the specs it offers.

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Uber Tips for a Smooth Rideshare

However you feel about the ridesharing service’s business practices, Uber is hard to avoid. And it has a lot more going on under the hood than you might realize.

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Who Owns the Moon? A Space Lawyer Answers

Who Owns the Moon? A Space Lawyer Answers

An anonymous reader shares a report: While the legal status of the Moon as a “global commons” accessible to all countries on peaceful missions did not meet any substantial resistance or challenge, the Outer Space Treaty left further details unsettled. Contrary to the very optimistic assumptions made at the time, so far humankind has not returned to the moon since 1972, making lunar land rights largely theoretical. That is, until a few years ago when several new plans were hatched to go back to the moon. In addition at least two U.S. companies, Planetary Resources and Deep Space Industries, which have serious financial backing, have started targeting asteroids for the purpose of mining their mineral resources. Geek note: Under the aforementioned Outer Space Treaty, the moon and other celestial bodies such as asteroids, legally speaking, belong in the same basket. None of them can become the “territory” of one sovereign state or another. The very fundamental prohibition under the Outer Space Treaty to acquire new state territory, by planting a flag or by any other means, failed to address the commercial exploitation of natural resources on the moon and other celestial bodies. This is a major debate currently raging in the international community, with no unequivocally accepted solution in sight yet. Roughly, there are two general interpretations possible.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, moon
Droppers Is How Android Malware Keeps Sneaking Into the Play Store

Droppers Is How Android Malware Keeps Sneaking Into the Play Store

Catalin Cimpanu, writing for BleepingComputer: For the past year, Android malware authors have been increasingly relying on a solid trick for bypassing Google’s security scans and sneaking malicious apps into the official Play Store. The trick relies on the use of a technique that’s quite common in desktop-based malware, but which in the last year is also becoming popular on the Android market. The technique involves the usage of “droppers,” a term denoting a dual or multiple-stage infection process in which the first stage malware is often a simplistic threat with limited capabilities, and its main role is to gain a foothold on a device in order to download more potent threats. But while on desktop environments droppers aren’t particularly efficient, as the widespread use of antivirus software detects them and their second-stage payloads, the technique is quite effective on the mobile scene.

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Posted by amiller in Android, Blog
Microsoft PowerShell Core For Linux Now Available as a Snap

Microsoft PowerShell Core For Linux Now Available as a Snap

Canonical announced on Friday that Microsoft’s PowerShell Core is now available on Linux platform as a Snap. From a report: If you aren’t familiar, a Snap is essentially a packaged version of a program that can be easily installed on many Linux distributions. Many see it as the future of Linux, as it has the potential to reduce fragmentation. “Built on the .NET Framework, PowerShell is an open source task-based command-line shell and scripting language with the goal of being the ubiquitous language for managing hybrid cloud assets. It is designed specifically for system administrators and power-users to rapidly automate the administration of multiple operating systems and the processes related to the applications that run on those operating systems,” says Canonical.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, microsoft