Why Splunk keeps beating open source competitors

All essential data infrastructure these days is open source. Or rather, nearly all — Splunk, the log analysis tool, remains stubbornly, happily proprietary. Despite a sea of competitors, the best of them open source, Splunk continues to generate mountains of cash.
The question is why. Why does Splunk exist given that “no dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last 10 years in closed-source, proprietary form,” as Cloudera co-founder Mike Olson has said? True, Splunk was founded in 2003, 10 years before Olson’s declaration, but the real answer for Splunk’s continued relevance may come down to both product completeness and industry inertia.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Powered by WPeMatico

Posted by amiller in Blog

Mesosphere DC/OS brings elastic scale to Redis, Couchbase

Mesosphere DC/OS, the datacenter automation solution built atop the Apache Mesos orchestration system to provide one-click management for complex applications, has now hit its 1.9 revision.
With this release, Mesosphere is once again emphasizing DC/OS as a solution for deploying and maintaining large, complex data-centric applications. Version 1.9 adds out-of-the-box support for several major data services and a passel of improvements for DC/OS’s existing container support.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Powered by WPeMatico

Posted by amiller in Blog

Review: MongoDB learns cool new tricks

MongoDB 3.4 continues the trend of databases building out support for a range of conceptual data models over the same underlying data store. This multimodel approach aims to deliver a single database that can be used to store data as documents, tables, and graphs simultaneously. The benefit to the user is a dramatically simplified infrastructure when compared to a polyglot persistence model, which might entail managing three or four separate data stores to satisfy those different use cases.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here(Insider Story)

Powered by WPeMatico

Posted by amiller in Blog

Rejected! 3 lies sink tech contenders

Over the course of my IT career, I’ve hired a lot of people. My track record isn’t perfect, but overall I did pretty well in finding good candidates for the jobs. But there have been lessons along the way. For example, I’ve learned to never accept a resume at face value. Here are three stories to illustrate the point.
It was the height of the dot-com era, and I worked for a large tech company that put me in charge of a joint venture with another large tech company.[ Get a $50 American Express gift card if we publish your tech story (anonymously, of course). Send your true tale of hires gone awry or other memorable adventures in the tech trenches to offtherecord@infoworld.com. | Follow Off the Record on Twitter and subscribe to the newsletter. ] This venture was a small one, but it was a web-enabled business-to-consumer entity we’ll call “jointco,” and we were all excited. During this time, our web-capable technicians were billed out, so I outsourced our web development to a small services firm, and we got up and running in fine fashion.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Powered by WPeMatico

Posted by amiller in Blog
One million trained! But the task of getting Africa digital is just beginning.

One million trained! But the task of getting Africa digital is just beginning.

“It’s all about helping young people start new careers and create opportunities for themselves,” says Segun Abodunrin. He’s one of 1 million young Africans who have taken advantage of Google’s digital skills training program, and who are finding their way in the world of digital.Last April, we set out to help bridge the digital skills gap in Africa when we pledged to train 1 million young people in the region. Today, we’re excited to announce that we’ve met that target. One million Africans have now been trained and equipped with the skills they need to navigate and take advantage of the opportunities of the web.But that’s not the best part of the story. Through these new digital experts, the continent is seeing an increase in the number of young people equipped with digital skills—a domino effect of sorts.In 2016, Segun Abodunrin hired his first two employees in Lagos. Just a year before Segun had never thought about opening his own business. But after taking our digital skills training program, he went on to start Tway Media, a digital consulting and training company credited to have trained 5,000 young Africans in 2016 alone.

Segun Abodunrin at one of his trainings

When we announced our commitment to provide digital skills training, we believed that more needed to be done to empower more young people in Africa to succeed. The web is at the heart of economic growth across the world, and it presents opportunities for anyone to create connections and access opportunities that will positively change their lives and boost economies.As a result of this training and other similar initiatives, we’ve discovered a new generation of Africans who are eager to explore how to take better advantage of the internet and the opportunities it offers. But the task of helping more Africans to leverage the growing digital market is one that requires continuous support from organizations, companies and also from governments. We’ve been glad to see the rising number of government-led initiatives focused on helping to train more young Africans on how to use online tools.But there’s more to be done by governments—policies and laws still need to be passed to create the right conditions for digital entrepreneurs and businesses. Everyone needs to play a part.So what’s next for us?We’re now extending our commitment to help more communities outside urban centers of Africa acquire digital skills. We’ll focus on relationships at the regional, country and local community levels through partnerships that lead to jobs and business growth. We’ll do this in a variety of ways:We will  provide offline versions of our online training materials to reach individuals and businesses in low access areas where we were unable to hold physical trainings. Our goal is to ensure that everyone, regardless of location and online status, is able to access these trainings.We will  deliver our offline trainings in Swahili, IsiZulu and Hausa. We understand the role of local languages in communicating with rural communities of Africa and want to ensure that more non-English speaking Africans get an opportunity to take these trainings.Our offline training effort to reach students, job seekers and business owners will continue through face-to-face trainings managed by our partners.We will hold regular meet-ups to drive engagement around the value of the web at the community level with those trained, Policy makers and influencers within those communities.Finally, we’ll continue to focus on achieving gender balance by ensuring that at least 40 percent of the people trained are women.We’re committed to helping Africans make the most of the digital revolution. There’s never been a better time to be in Africa.

Powered by WPeMatico

Posted by amiller in Blog, Google in Europe

Duty bound

It’s 1999, and this programmer pilot fish gets a new assignment: create software to help recover the import duties for some of the components in products his company manufactures.”This ‘duty drawback’ process is quite involved,” fish says. “It requires tracking every foreign purchase of components, what items each component was used in, if it was scrapped, where the final product shipped and if it was shipped out of the country — in which case we could claim 99 percent of the import duties we paid on all foreign components.”This was all being done manually by a woman in the shipping office who reported to the shipping manager.”Fish travels to several meetings to learn more about the requirements he has to implement. Then he works for months and months with the shipping-office user as he implements the process in Cobol for the mainframe.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Powered by WPeMatico

Posted by amiller in Blog

Spy agency, DOE, see China nearing supercomputing leadership

Advanced computing experts at the National Security Agency and the Department of Energy are warning that China is “extremely likely” to take leadership in supercomputing as early as 2020, unless the U.S. acts quickly to increase spending.China’s supercomputing advances are not only putting national security at risk, but also U.S. leadership in high-tech manufacturing. If China succeeds, it may “undermine profitable parts of the U.S. economy,” according to a report titled U.S. Leadership in High Performance Computing by HPC technical experts at the NSA, the DOE, the National Science Foundation and other agencies.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Powered by WPeMatico

Posted by amiller in Blog