PeerTube, the 'Decentralized YouTube,' Succeeds In Crowdfunding

PeerTube, the 'Decentralized YouTube,' Succeeds In Crowdfunding

A crowdfunded project, known as “PeerTube,” has blown through its initial goal with 53,100 euros collected in forty-two days. The project aims to be “a fully decentralized version of YouTube, whose computer code is freely accessible and editable, and where videos are shared between users without relying on a central system.” The goal is PeerTube to officially launch by October. Quariety reports: PeerTube relies on a decentralized and federative system. In other words, there is no higher authority that manages, broadcasts and moderates the content offered, as is the case with YouTube, but a network of “instances.” Created by one or more administrators, these communities are governed according to principles specific to each of them. Anyone can freely watch the videos without registering, but to upload a video, you must choose from the list of existing instances, or create your own if you have the necessary technical knowledge. At the moment, 141 instances are proposed. Most do not have specifics, but one can find communities centered on a theme or open to a particular region of the world. In all, more than 4,000 people are currently registered on PeerTube, for a total of 338,000 views for 11,000 videos. The project does not display ads, unlike YouTube. “In terms of monetization, we wanted to make a neutral tool,” says Pouhiou, communication officer for Framasoft, the origin of PeerTube. The site will rely on a “support” button at the start, but “people will be able to code their own monetization system” in the future.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, youtube
Waymo's Autonomous Vehicles Are Driving 25,000 Miles Every Day

Waymo's Autonomous Vehicles Are Driving 25,000 Miles Every Day

With Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval at the National Governors Association, Waymo CEO John Krafcik announced a huge milestone: Waymo’s fleet of self-driving vehicles are now logging 25,000 miles every day on public roads. The company reportedly has 600 self-driving Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans on the road in 25 cities. Waymo has also driven 8 million miles on public roads using its autonomous vehicles, “meaning the comopany has been able to double the number of autonomous miles driven on public roads in just eight months,” reports TechCrunch. From the report: The company also relies on simulation as it works to build an AI-based self-driving system that performs better than a human. In the past nine years, Waymo has “driven” more than 5 billion miles in its simulation, according to the company. That’s the equivalent to 25,000 virtual cars driving all day, everyday, the company says. This newly shared goal signals Waymo is getting closer to launching a commercial driverless transportation service later this year. More than 400 residents in Phoenix have been trialing Waymo’s technology by using an app to hail self-driving Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans. The company says it plans to launch its service later this year.

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Transportation
Uber Drivers 'Employees' For Unemployment Purposes, New York Labor Board Says

Uber Drivers 'Employees' For Unemployment Purposes, New York Labor Board Says

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: New York City’s largest taxi driver advocacy group is hailing a legal decision by the New York State Unemployment Insurance Appeal Board, which ruled last Friday that three out-of-work Uber drivers can be considered employees for the purpose of unemployment benefits. The decision was first reported Thursday by Politico. In other words, three men — and possibly other “similarly situated” Uber drivers who had quit over low pay or who were deactivated from the Uber platform — can get paid. “The decision means that New York Uber drivers can file for unemployment insurance and likely receive it,” Veena Dubal, a labor law professor at the University of California Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, emailed Ars. “Uber may appeal the decision to state court, but for now, it’s good law.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, business
Containers or Virtual Machines: Which is More Secure?

Containers or Virtual Machines: Which is More Secure?

Are virtual machines (VM) more secure than containers? You may think you know the answer, but IBM Research has found containers can be as secure, or more secure, than VMs. From a report: James Bottomley, an IBM Research Distinguished Engineer and top Linux kernel developer, writes: “One of the biggest problems with the current debate about Container vs Hypervisor security is that no-one has actually developed a way of measuring security, so the debate is all in qualitative terms (hypervisors ‘feel’ more secure than containers because of the interface breadth) but no-one actually has done a quantitative comparison.” To meet this need, Bottomley created Horizontal Attack Profile (HAP), designed to describe system security in a way that it can be objectively measured. Bottomley has discovered that “a Docker container with a well crafted seccomp profile (which blocks unexpected system calls) provides roughly equivalent security to a hypervisor.”

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Posted by amiller in Blog, Security

Cop Costs Taxpayers $60,000 And One (1) Drug Bust After Lying About Almost Everything Related To The Traffic Stop

Oh my. What fun it must have been for this officer to find out his lies were contradicted by his partner’s body camera footage. Thanks to these lies, Officer Joshua Bates of the San Jose Police Department is now former officer Josh Bates, target of a federal civil rights lawsuit. But his troubles began during the traffic stop, culminating in this (first) judicial vindication of Cosme Grijalva.

Saying he was “troubled” by the testimony, Superior Court Judge Eric Geffon threw out the drug case in October against former suspect Cosme Grijalva, after the prosecution dismissed the charges. The City Council on Tuesday agreed to settle a civil-rights lawsuit filed by attorney Jaime Leaños on Gijalva’s behalf for $59,900.

No charges and a cash settlement. That’s the way things break when officers lie. And lie Bates did. Several times

First, he trapped himself in a lie during cross examination. While seeking to obtain consent to search Grijalva’s car, Bates used his phone to contact a translator to help bridge the language gap. Pushed for details on this mysterious translator — one that had changed sexes during the course of his testimony — Bates finally settled on calling the translator “she.” Then he admitted it wasn’t a department translator, but rather someone named Lilia… who just happened to be Bates’ wife.

Body-camera video recorded by Bates’ partner, Ian Hawkley, who is also named in the suit, shows Bates telling his wife over the phone: “So what you’re going to do is you’re going to tell this person that I know there is methamphetamine in the car — crystal, and you are going to tell him that I’m going to get a dog who’s going to come over and is going to sniff and tear their car apart.”

Hawkley’s video came as a surprise to Bates. Not a complete surprise, though. At one point in the recording, Hawkley let Bates know he was “in the red” (recording) and had been “for awhile.” By that point, too much damage had been done. Bates had already called his wife to translate his threat for Grijalva and was engaged in a warrantless search of Grijalva’s van without his consent. Bates did not activate his camera, violating PD policy. He also admitted to trying to get Hawkley to deactivate his body cam.

Bates apparently had an ongoing aversion to complying with the Constitution and PD policies.

There is evidence suggesting this might not have been a one-time instance for Bates. According to court documents filed by Singh, the week before Bates’ encounter with Grijalva, he and another officer stopped and arrested a bicyclist on suspicion of alleged marijuana possession. Body-worn camera footage reportedly showed that Bates omitted mentioning a pat-down search in his police report on the incident.

Other video from that case also shows Bates having a conversation with another officer about how to come up with probable cause to make an enforcement stop when there is nothing readily apparent.

Bates also fudged the paperwork in this case. He tried to align his testimony with his bogus police reports but got tripped up by his own faulty memory and his partner’s recording of the incident. And that has netted him two lawsuits and an early exit from his law enforcement career. Bates resigned shortly after this disastrous courtroom performance. With any luck, he’ll be employed by another law enforcement agency before too long. You know how it is with bad hombres like this. They get sprung on technicalities and are back on the streets (in uniform) within days or weeks of an unceremonious sacking/resignation-tendering.

The only thing in this story that makes it an anomaly is the resignation. Other than that, it’s par for the course. Cops lie. And the reason they do it so frequently is that they almost always get away with it. Cameras are changing that… slowly. But they’re only slightly better than nothing at all at this point. The sad thing is, we’ll just have to take what we can get because law enforcement agencies clearly aren’t interested in upsetting the apple cart and letting all these “bad apples” roll into the nearest gutter. Change comes from within and law enforcement has proven itself highly resistant to change.

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Posted by amiller in Blog